Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a very large data (12G) that looks like this:

foo  r1.1   abc
foo  r10.1  pqr
qux  r2.1   lmn
bar  r33.1  xpq

What I want to do is to sort 2nd field numerically yielding (in reality there are more leading fields):

foo  r1.1   abc
qux  r2.1   lmn
foo  r10.1  pqr
bar  r33.1  xpq

I tried the following but won't work:

   sort -k1 -n

What's the right way to do it?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about sort -k1.2n if it starts with just an r

share|improve this answer
    
@Aljohs: thanks it works. Sorry, but my example is to simplified actually the field need to be sorted is not in 1st column. I have updated my example. Is there a way I can modify your approach? –  neversaint Nov 25 '11 at 13:40
1  
-k2.2n if I understood you correctly –  iccthedral Nov 25 '11 at 13:44
    
Thanks. But it didn't work. I tried this snippet perl -e 'foreach $i (1,10,2,33) {print "foo\tr".$i."\.1\n";}' | sort -k2.2n –  neversaint Nov 25 '11 at 13:51
1  
cat temp | sort -t $'\t' -k2.2n works fine on my machine But, iff \t is the delimiter and the field you want to be sorted by is the second one, and it starts with alpha character. –  iccthedral Nov 25 '11 at 14:14
    
Thanks. it works beautifully. That condition is just right! –  neversaint Nov 25 '11 at 14:24

You almost had it - you need to do:

sort -k2

-k1 starts from the first character.

share|improve this answer
    
huh? I don't get it. Did it work when you tried it? –  neversaint Nov 25 '11 at 13:38
    
D'oh, sorry - just "sort -k2" gives the output you want. (Edit: well, it did before you updated the question. :) –  pgl Nov 25 '11 at 13:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.