Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code in a class member function:

int state = 0;
int code = static_cast<int>(letter_[i]);
if (isalnum(code)) {
      state = testTable[state][0];
    } else if (isspace(code)) {
        state = testTable[state][2];
    } else if (code == OPEN_TAG) {
        state = testTable[state][3];
    } else if (code == CLOSE_TAG) {
        state = testTable[state][4];
    } else {
        state = testTable[state][1];
    }

    switch (state) {
    case 1: // alphanumeric symbol was read
        buffer[j] = letter_[i];
        ++j;
        break;
    case 2: // delimeter was read
        j = 0;
    //  buffer.clear();
        break;
    }

However, if state is a class member variable rather than local, the performance drops considerably (~ 5 times). I was reading about differences in accessing local variables and class members, but texts usually say that it affects performance very slightly.

If it helps: I am using MinGW GCC compiler with -O3 option.

share|improve this question
3  
How have you measured it? –  Etienne de Martel Nov 25 '11 at 13:31
    
In your code, state is a local variable... –  Luchian Grigore Nov 25 '11 at 13:32
    
Etienne de Martel, just like this: double diff = difftime (end,start); –  Anton Frolov Nov 25 '11 at 13:33
2  
When state is a class member it may be impossible for the compiler to prove that the assignment to buffer[j] does not modify state, so it will not be able to keep state in a register. But I'd be surprised if that was enough to cause a factor of 5 difference. –  Alan Stokes Nov 25 '11 at 13:37
2  
The narrative is pretty clear, but what exactly is the question? –  NPE Nov 25 '11 at 13:41

1 Answer 1

I could not reproduce your observation, testing on x86_64 with both, VS10 and g++. The local variant is slightly faster, probably due to what Alan Stokes described in his comment, but at most ~10%. You should check your timing, try to rule out any other problems and best would be the reduce all your code to a very simple test-cast which still shows this behavior.

I think my test-case resembles your scenario quite good, at least like you described it:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/timer.hpp>

const int max_iter = 1<<31;
const int start_value = 65535;

struct UseMember
{
    int member;
    void foo()
    {
        for(int i=0; i<max_iter; ++i)
        {
            if(member%2)
                member = 3*member+1;
            else
                member = member>>1;
        }
        std::cout << "Value=" << member << std::endl;
    }
};

struct UseLocal
{
    void foo()
    {
        int local = start_value;
        for(int i=0; i<max_iter; ++i)
        {
            if((local%2)!=0) /* odd */
                local = 3*local+1;
            else /* even */
                local = local>>1;
        }
        std::cout << "Value=" << local << std::endl;
    }
};


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    /* First, test using member */
    std::cout << "** Member Access" << std::endl;
    {
        UseMember bar;
        bar.member = start_value;
        boost::timer T;
        bar.foo();
        double e = T.elapsed();
        std::cout << "Time taken: " << e << "s" << std::endl;
    }

    /* Then, test using local */
    std::cout << "** Local Access" << std::endl;
    {
        UseLocal bar;
        boost::timer T;
        bar.foo();
        double e = T.elapsed();
        std::cout << "Time taken: " << e << "s" << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.