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I have a type defined like this:

struct DynTab_s {
    int     object_count;
    //other fields
    void    *data;
};

typedef struct DynTab_s *Dyntab_t; //note that type I use is pointer to struct

I have a storage utility that I can user to store and retrieve them. I've chosen to support int, double and pointer type. I have a function to retrieve the int and double values by key:

int MyHashtableGet(MyHashtable_t Hashtable, void *Key, void *Value)
{   
    void    *Row = NULL;
    int     RetValue = -1;

    MakeRow(Hashtable, Key, NULL, &Row);
    if (!MyStoreSelect(Hashtable->TableId, Row))
    {
        switch (Hashtable->ValueType)
        {
        case MY_HASHTABLE_TYPE_INT: 
            *(int *)Value = *(int *)((char *)Row + Hashtable->KeySize);
            break;
        case MY_HASHTABLE_TYPE_POINTER:
            //after row below I can see the DynTab_t in the item when I cast it
            Value = *(void **)*(int **)((char *)Row + Hashtable->KeySize);
        break;
        }
    }
    MyFree(Row);

    return RetValue;
}

that work for int. But not for pointer when I try to get Dyntab_t. This works if I use function

void *MyHashtableGetPointer(MyHashtable_t Hashtable, void *Key)
{
    void        *Row = NULL;
    void        *RetValue = NULL;

    MakeRow(Hashtable, Key, NULL, &Row);
    if (!MyStoreSelect(Hashtable->TableId, Row))
        RetValue = *(void **)*(int **)((char *)Row + Hashtable->KeySize);

    MyFree(Row);

    return RetValue;
}

when I call it with:

int       Key = 1;
DynTab_t  MyTab;

MyTab = (DynTab_t)MyHashtableGetPointer(MyHashtable, &Key);

The question is can I at all use this MyHashtableGet to get DynTab_t item or does second parameter have to be void ** type? If yes, can you please provide the exact syntax to call and to MyHashtableGet in case of MY_HASHTABLE_TYPE_POINTER.

Thanks & BR -Matti

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The question is can I at all use this MyHashtableGet to get DynTab_t item or does second parameter have to be void ** type?

The only difference (if you're storing the pointers like you store the int values) would be that when retrieving an int, you'd pass the address of an int variable; and when retrieving a pointer, you'd pass the address of a pointer variable. A void * can hold the address of anything (except functions sometimes) -- including other pointers. So the last parameter is fine as void *, as long as you handle it appropriately elsewhere.

I'm not sure what you're doing in your function, though. If you store the pointers the same way as the ints in your data structure, so that at the same level of indirection you'd have an int for the integer type and a void * for the pointer type, then why are they dereferenced to different levels?

    case MY_HASHTABLE_TYPE_INT: 
        *(int *)Value = *(int *)((char *)Row + Hashtable->KeySize);
        break;

In the above, it seems that ((char *)Row + Hashtable->KeySize) gets you the pointer to whatever value you've stored, though of the wrong pointer type. Then the (int *) casts to a pointer of your data's type (int in this case), which you then dereference and assign to what Value points to.

    case MY_HASHTABLE_TYPE_POINTER:
        Value = *(void **)*(int **)((char *)Row + Hashtable->KeySize);
    break;

But here, you cast to int **, dereference, cast to void **, then dereference again, and assign to Value instead of what Value points at? Isn't that one too many dereferences? Shouldn't you assign to the target of Value rather than Value? And why do you need to cast to int ** at all? I think it should be more like this:

    case MY_HASHTABLE_TYPE_POINTER:
        *(void **)Value = *(void **)((char *)Row + Hashtable->KeySize);
        break;

Then, when calling to get an int:

...
int       Val;
MyHashtableGet(Table, Key, &Val);

...and when calling to get a pointer:

...
void      *Val;
MyHashtableGet(Table, Key, &Val);

Edit: This assumes one of two things, though: That the the variable you passed the address of in Value is void *, or that the variable you passed the address of is of a type that is internally represented the same way as void * (often true, but not guaranteed). If you want to rely on the pointer type being converted on assignment (in case their representations differ), you could implement your MyHashtableGetPointer() function as a wrapper for MyHashtableGet():

void *MyHashtableGetPointer(MyHashtable_t Hashtable, void *Key)
{
  void *res = NULL;
  MyHashtableGet(Hashtable, Key, &res);
  return res;
}
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thanks dimitri! i gotta put some thinking to your answer. hate to admit but i'm terribly with these pointers when it's get beyond the very basics. i test it tomorrow. thanks again. –  matti Nov 25 '11 at 19:19
    
If you know the pointers will always be Dyntab_t (struct DynTab_s *) then you could change *(void **)Value = to *(Dyntab_t *)Value = , which would also take care of the difference between the internal representations of void * and struct DynTab_s * (if there is a one). –  Dmitri Nov 25 '11 at 23:41
    
no, I don't know the type. I'm more C# programmer and I just get fed up with not having Hashtable/HashList.So I try to make it as general as possible. Anyway I start to test ur solution now! –  matti Nov 26 '11 at 7:00
    
thanks a lot dimitri! in function MyHashtableGet as you said case MY_HASHTABLE_TYPE_POINTER: *(void **)Value = *(void **)((char *)Row + Hashtable->KeySize); and in calling function calling it with parameter void *Value and then I have to cast it Tab2 = *(Dyntab_t *)Value; –  matti Nov 26 '11 at 8:28
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It really depends on how you want to do it. You can do it using a reference (only in C++) or a pointer (C and C++):

void changeTheParamRef(struct myStruct &s)
{
    myStruct other;
    s = other; // or
    s.something = other.something;
}

void changeTheParamPtr(struct myStruct *s)
{
    myStruct other;
    *s = other; // or
    s->something = other.something;
}

void allocStruct(struct myStruct **s)
{
    *s = malloc(sizeof(myStruct));
}

You don't need a pointer to a pointer unless you'd like to return or change a pointer instead of a value.

To call above samples:

myStruct s;
changeTheParamRef(s);
changeTheParamPtr(&s);

myStruct *p;
allocStruct(&p);
changeTheParamRef(*p);
changeTheParamPtr(p);
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, but this is not an answer to my question. what I want is to use 1 function, namely MyHashtableGet, to get all the values from MyHashtable. this is why I use void *Value. also getting the value from a row is a bit more complicated than in ur answer: *(void **)*(int **)((char *)Row + Hashtable->KeySize); –  matti Nov 25 '11 at 15:20
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