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validator.w3.org considers the following valid HTML:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
 <head>
  <title>Test</title>
 </head>
 <body>
  <div>This <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<b>is</b> a test.</div>
 </body>
</html>

Is it really valid?

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Might be worth knowing for the future, that while it is valid HTML 4.01 Strict, it is invalid in HTML5. –  Alohci Nov 25 '11 at 21:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, the tag would just be treated as additional text. It's not part of the HTML tag.

It'd just print

This <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<is a test.

Nothing wrong with that.

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Does that mean that representing angle brackets as &lt; and &gt; is not always required in HTML? –  SlimShaggy Nov 25 '11 at 16:10
1  
As far as I know, not when you're validating as HTML Strict, but it is when using XHTML. –  Brandon Nov 25 '11 at 16:13

This code is successfully verified using the W3C Validator. And the page will be shown on all major browsers (Firefox, Opera, Chrome and Internet Explorer) as expected.

You can check the result here: http://validator.w3.org/

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When validating as HTML it is allowed, but not when validating as XHTML.

Here you need to use &lt; and &gt;, which is best practise anyway.

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I tested your code in w3c. It's perfectly valid according to w3c standard :)

But it's always a good practice to work with HTML entities. You can write "<" or "<" in spite of writing ">". We use HTML entities to ensure exact result for all browsers and platforms. Reference:http://www.w3schools.com/html/html_entities.asp

Best Regards, Touhid

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