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Let's consider the following simplified Resource hierarchy:

public abstract class Resource {
    static public boolean accepts(String resource);
}

public class AudioResource extends Resource {
    static public boolean accepts(String resource) {
        //Check if we can proceed this resource as audio
        //Some complex logic there ...
    }
}

public class VideoResource extends Resource {
    static public boolean accepts(String resource) {
        //Check if we can proceed this resource as video
        //Another complex logic there
    }
}

Resource has dozens subclasses and number grows. Each sub-resource:

  • has some logic to determine if it accepts resource or not. E.g. it may parse resource URL with regexp or something;
  • is not singleton by design;

Now, we want to create a factory which iterates through all available subclasses and creates one which accepts resource (checks it using the accepts method).

Something like this (let's suppose for a moment that Java has static methods polymorphism):

public class ResourceFactory {

    private static List<Class<Resource>> registry;
    {
        //Populate registry once on start
    }


    public static Resource createResource(String resource) {
        for (Class<Resource> clazz : registry) {
            if (clazz.accepts(resource)) 
                return clazz.createInstance(resource);
        }
    }    
}  

Unfortunately (or not?), Java doesn't support polymorphic static methods. Considering that, what are the possible ways to design Resource and ResourceFactory?

share|improve this question
1  
Make accepts non-static? –  Victor Sorokin Nov 25 '11 at 16:39
    
Other way is to employ reflection. –  Victor Sorokin Nov 25 '11 at 16:39
    
How accepts can be non-static? In this case we would need to create instance every time we want to check. –  Shcheklein Nov 25 '11 at 16:42
    
You can create instances at some other place and pass them into caller class code as, say, constructor params. –  Victor Sorokin Nov 25 '11 at 16:45
    
Reflection is definitely the way, but we don't have required interface for each Resource in this case. It's possible to write Resource without accepts at all. –  Shcheklein Nov 25 '11 at 16:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use:

public interface Resource {
  // some methods
} 

public interface ResourceFactory {
  boolean acceptsResource(String resource);
  Resource createResource(String resource) throws UnsupportedResourceException;
}   

public final MultiResourceFactory implements ResourceFactory{
   private static final ServiceLoader<ResourceFactory > resourceFactoryLoader
       = ServiceLoader.load(ResourceFactory .class);
   private static final MultiResourceFactory INSTANCE;

  private MultiResourceFactory(){
  }

  public static MultiResourceFactory getInstance(){
    if (INSTANCE == null){
        INSTANCE = new MultiResourceFactory();
    }
    return INSTANCE;
  }
  @Override
  public boolean acceptsResource(String resource){
      for (ResourceFactory resourceFactory : resourceFactoryLoader) {
         if (resourceFactory.acceptsResource(resource)){
             return true;
         }
      }
      return false;
  }

  @Override
  public Resource createResource(String resource) throws UnsupportedResourceException{
      for (ResourceFactory resourceFactory : resourceFactoryLoader) {
         if (resourceFactory.acceptsResource(resource)){
             return resourceFactory.createResource(resource);
         }
      }
      throw new UnsupportedResourceException(resource);
  }   

See ServiceLoader for how to register the factories: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/ServiceLoader.html

Note: the code is untested

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer! So, we enforce one factory per Resource. I thought about this, and it seemed a bit heavy to me. Though considering that ServiceLoader's documentation describes almost what I need ... probably, this is the best solution for now. –  Shcheklein Nov 26 '11 at 0:01
    
BTW, do you know some other possible ways to design? Without a lot of additional objects? (I mean one additional ResourceFactory per Resource). –  Shcheklein Nov 26 '11 at 0:06

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