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I need your help with formate a txt file using bash/linux. The file looks like the following, it always has a line called Rate: Sth then it follows with the details in the very specific format. I'd like to split the file up with one rate for each file. In this example, I'd like to have 3 file, and each has the corresponding line says what the Rate value was.

How will you approach this?

line No. Main Text
1    Rate: GBP
2    12/01/1999,90.5911501,Validated
     .....
     .....
210  18/01/1999,90.954996,Validated
211  Rate: RMB
212  24/04/2008,132.2542,Validated
     .....
1000 25/04/2008,132.2279,Validated
1001 28/04/2008,131.69915,Validated
1002 Rate: USD
1003 21/11/11,-0.004419534,Validated
share|improve this question
    
Just to clarify that the Line number is not part of the file. – Dean Nov 25 '11 at 17:34
    
I also want the output file contains the Rate: *** line. – Dean Nov 25 '11 at 17:44

This might work for you:

csplit -z -f 'temp' -b '%02d.txt' file /Rate/ {*}

This will produce files temp00.txt, temp01.txt...

If you only want the Rate line then;

sed -i '/Rate/!d' temp*.txt
share|improve this answer

I'd do this in perl:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

open (my $out, ">-") or die "oops";

while(<>)
{
    if (m/^Rate: (\w+)/o)
    {
        close $out and open ($out, ">$1") or die "oops";
        next;
    }

    print $out $_
}

Use it like

perl ./test.pl input.txt
share|improve this answer
2  
Clever first open to allow succinct loop. Very nice. – JRFerguson Nov 25 '11 at 17:25
    
+1 for inspiring answer. See my answer for the one-liner version of your idea. – TLP Nov 25 '11 at 19:36

A one-liner inspired by sehe's answer:

>perl -pwe '
> if (/^Rate: (.+)/) { 
>    open $out, ">", "Rate_$1.txt" or die $!; 
>    select $out; 
> }' gasdata.txt

The -p option will read a line and print it after the code in -e is evaluated. select will choose a default filehandle for print. So, basically, what we are doing is simply juggling the filehandle around, depending on which Rate is currently the active one.

Here's the code deparsed:

>perl -MO=Deparse -pwe 'if (/^Rate: (.+)/) { open $out, ">", "output/Rate_$1.txt" or die $!; select $out; }' gasdata.txt
BEGIN { $^W = 1; }
LINE: while (defined($_ = <ARGV>)) {
    if (/^Rate: (.+)/) {
        die $! unless open $out, '>', "output/Rate_$1.txt";
        select $out;
    }
}
continue {
    die "-p destination: $!\n" unless print $_;
}
-e syntax OK
share|improve this answer

(g)awk to the rescue:

awk '/^Rate:/ {output_file_name=$2; getline } 
     { print $0 >> ( output_file_name ) }' INPUT_FILE

The first rule and command executes for the lines that starts with Rate: and only sets the output file name, then gets the next line from the input file. Then this next line is processed and gets written to the output file. After that the next line is processed by only the second command (gets written to the output file), but only if it not matches Rate:.

NOTE: The above solution might fail if there is a section in the input file with two continuous lines of Rate:s, like this:

... DATA ...
Rate: GBP
Rate: CHF
... DATA ...

should do (assuming that the line numbers are not part of the original file).

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
Wont this only get one line after your matched pattern? – jaypal singh Nov 25 '11 at 19:27
    
Explanation added. – Zsolt Botykai Nov 26 '11 at 10:29
    
Thanks Zsolt for the explanation. Don't know why, but I am still having issues running the one-liner. Shouldn't the print $0 >> output_file_name have " around the output_file_name – jaypal singh Nov 26 '11 at 10:45
    
Ah, you are right, I mieed one thing, and now corrected it! – Zsolt Botykai Nov 26 '11 at 10:58

Another solution: It just makes your input file into a script and then runs it:

sed 's/^Rate:/cat <<EOF >/; 1!s/^cat <<EOF/EOF\n&/; $aEOF' input.txt | bash

I assumed the line numbers are not part of the file.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this solution! Especially the way you use the rate's text to name the file. A small quibble but may save a few hairs - here documents will interpolate variables etc by default s/^Rate:/cat <<\\EOF >/ will turn it off. – potong Nov 30 '11 at 16:52
    
A small tweak and you can have the Rate... line too. /^Rate:/{h;s//.../;G}; – potong Nov 30 '11 at 17:04

You can use something like this in perl -

Perl Script:

#!/usr/bin/perl

undef $/;
$_ = <>;
$n = 0;

for $match (split(/(?=Rate)/)) {
      open(O, '>temp' . ++$n);
      print O $match;
      close(O);
}

Execution:

[jaypal~/temp]$ ./spl.pl temp.file

[jaypal~/temp]$ **cat temp.file**
Line No. Main Text
1    Rate: GBP
2    12/01/1999,90.5911501,Validated
     .....
     .....
210  18/01/1999,90.954996,Validated
211  Rate: RMB
212  24/04/2008,132.2542,Validated
     .....
1000 25/04/2008,132.2279,Validated
1001 28/04/2008,131.69915,Validated
1002 Rate: USD
1003 21/11/11,-0.004419534,Validated

[jaypal~/temp]$ cat temp1
Line No. Main Text
1    

[jaypal~/temp]$ cat temp2
Rate: GBP
2    12/01/1999,90.5911501,Validated
     .....
     .....
210  18/01/1999,90.954996,Validated

211  

[jaypal~/temp]$ cat temp3
Rate: RMB
212  24/04/2008,132.2542,Validated
     .....
1000 25/04/2008,132.2279,Validated
1001 28/04/2008,131.69915,Validated

1002 [jaypal~/temp]$ cat temp4
Rate: USD
1003 21/11/11,-0.004419534,Validated
[jaypal~/temp]$ 
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