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Quite often I need to capture some paragraphs in a region with regexp - and then act on each paragraph.

For example consider a problem of recovering a numberd list:

1. Some text with a blank
line. I want not to have that line break
2. Some more text. Also - with
a line break.
3. I want to have a defun which
will capture each numbered entry
and then join it

I want to write a defun which will make the previous text like that:

1. Some text with a blank line. I want not to have that line break
2. Some more text. Also - with a line break.
3. I want to have a defun which will capture each numbered entry and then join it

Here's my best try for now:

(defun joining-lines (start end)
  (interactive "r")
  (save-restriction 
    (narrow-to-region start end)
    (goto-char (point-min))
    (while (search-forward-regexp "\\([[:digit:]]\\. \\)\\(\\[^[:digit:]\\].*?\\)" nil t)
           (replace-match "\\1\\,(replace-regexp-in-string " ;; here's a line break
" " " (match-string 2))" t nil))
   )
)

It neither work - nor give an error.

Actually it would be better to have a separate defun to act on a string. This way it will be easy to expand the code to have multiple substitutions on the replace-match.

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are two issues with your code:

  1. A period in a regexp matches "anything except newline," so your .*? will never include a newline character.
  2. The \,(...) regexp replacement construct is only available interactively. If issue #1 were resolved, you'd get an error (error "Invalid use of '\\' in replacement text"). Programmatically, you have to write the code yourself, eg: (replace-match (concat (match-string 1) (replace-regexp-in-string "\n" " " (match-string 2)))).

I think you'd be better off not relying on regexps to do the heavy lifting here. This works for me:

(defun massage-list (start end)
  (interactive "r")
  (save-excursion
    (save-restriction
      (narrow-to-region start end)
      (goto-char start)
      (while (progn (forward-line) (= (point) (line-beginning-position)))
        (when (not (looking-at "^[[:digit:]]+\\."))
          (delete-indentation)
          (beginning-of-line))))))
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Regarding \,() only being available interactively, you can use C-x M-: (repeat-complex-command) after running an interactive replacement using that syntax in order to obtain the equivalent elisp to use in a function. –  phils Nov 26 '11 at 16:15
    
Virtuosic code... –  Adobe Nov 27 '11 at 15:21
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Try something like this code. It's not the shortest possible but rather something straigthforward.

(defun joining-lines(start end)
  (interactive "r")
  (let ((newline-string "~~~"))
    (save-restriction 
      (narrow-to-region start end)
      (mark-whole-buffer)
      (replace-string "\n" newline-string)
      (goto-char start)
      (while (re-search-forward (concat newline-string "\\([[:digit:]]+. \\)") nil t)
        (replace-match "\n\\1" nil nil))
      (mark-whole-buffer)
      (replace-string newline-string " "))))
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Very original and approach. +1. –  Adobe Nov 27 '11 at 15:22
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Here's a solution using an external defun:

(defun capturing-paragraphs (start end)
  (interactive "r")
  (save-restriction 
    (narrow-to-region start end)
    (goto-char (point-min))
    (while (search-forward-regexp "^\\(^[[:digit:]]+\\.[^[:digit:]]+$\\)" nil t) (replace-match (multiple-find-replace-in-match) t nil))))

(defun multiple-find-replace-in-match ()
  "Returns a string based on current regex match."
  (let (matchedText newText)
    (setq matchedText
      (buffer-substring-no-properties
        (match-beginning 1) (match-end 1)))
    (setq newText
      (replace-regexp-in-string "\n" "" matchedText) )
    newText))

it works only if there's no figures in the text. But this solution is straighforward to expand - to add new replacements on a matched string.

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