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I have an array of characters populated by cin, but im trying to find a way to check each character individually to make sure its only one of a set number of characters (a-z,A-Z,0-9,[space]).

The easiest way I thought this could be done is to check if the code of the character fell within a certain range. But not sure how to get it.

Alternatively if anyone knows any other ways of doing it, that would be great.

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The functions in here might help. –  Lalaland Nov 25 '11 at 17:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The easiest way is to use isalpha(), isdigit() or isalnum():

char ch = ...  //  The character

//  Original solution
if (isalpha(ch) || isdigit(ch)){

}

//  Better solution by fefe (see comments)
if (isalnum(ch)){

}

These are defined in ctype.h: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cctype/

Otherwise you can also use comparisons:

if ('a' <= ch && ch <= 'z' ||
    'A' <= ch && ch <= 'Z' ||
    '0' <= ch && ch <= '9'
){

}

This latter approach using comparisons will generalize to arbitrary ranges.

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ah, is that with ctype.h? sorry, tad new to c++ –  topherg Nov 25 '11 at 17:49
1  
Was in the process of typing the first - therefore a point for nimble fingers! –  Ed Heal Nov 25 '11 at 17:49
    
Yes, it's in ctype.h. –  Mysticial Nov 25 '11 at 17:49
1  
There is also isalnum() –  fefe Nov 25 '11 at 17:55
    
@fefe: Wow, I didn't know that existed! Thanks! I'll add that to my answer. –  Mysticial Nov 25 '11 at 17:56

You can easily access a specific character code by using the character you want in single quotes, for example, 'A'. Therefore, if you wanted to check if a character is in a certain range:

char c = //some character
if ( c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z' ) {
    //do something
}

should work as you would expect. Additionally, if you are concerned about alpha-numerics specifically, there is a helper function called isalnum, defined in <ctype.h> that checks if a character is an alphanumeric character.

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You can determine if the number falls within the range you are looking for within an ASCII table: http://www.asciitable.com/index/asciifull.gif. So >= 48 && < 123.

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Though xxx >= 'A' && xxx <= 'Z' is easier and more reader/maintainer-friendly. –  user405725 Nov 25 '11 at 17:51
    
Agree, the other solutions are more appropriate. –  Ian Edwards Nov 25 '11 at 17:53
1  
Matches a huge variety of punctuation as well. If you do it this way, check each range (32, 48-57, 65-90, 97-122) separately. –  cHao Nov 25 '11 at 17:53

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