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Is there a function in Javascript similar to Python's range()?

I think there should be a better way than to write the following lines every time:

array = new Array();
for (i = 0; i < specified_len; i++) {
    array[i] = i;
}
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Such a functions would be of limited use without a foreach loop or some other way (succinct) to iterate over arrays or even arbitary iterable objects for some definition of "iterable" (an xrange equivalent is needed to make such loops memory efficient). –  delnan Nov 25 '11 at 18:35
1  
Is there a particular use case that you have in mind? –  Russ Cam Nov 25 '11 at 18:38
3  
@RussCam No, just want a handy function –  clwen Nov 25 '11 at 18:39
1  
@clwen: Unfortunately there is not, but take a look at my code - I have written a function that is aimed at emulating the way range() works in Python, so you can use it. There is no such function in JavaScript, but there are some plugins for different frameworks, such as Range class for MooTools. –  Tadeck Nov 25 '11 at 19:06
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3 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

No, there is none, but you can make one.

JavaScript's implementation of Python's range()

Trying to emulate how it works in Python, I would create function similar to this:

function range(start, stop, step){
    if (typeof stop=='undefined'){
        // one param defined
        stop = start;
        start = 0;
    };
    if (typeof step=='undefined'){
        step = 1;
    };
    if ((step>0 && start>=stop) || (step<0 && start<=stop)){
        return [];
    };
    var result = [];
    for (var i=start; step>0 ? i<stop : i>stop; i+=step){
        result.push(i);
    };
    return result;
};

See this jsfiddle for a proof.

Comparison between range() in JavaScript and Python

It works in the following way:

  • range(4) returns [0, 1, 2, 3],
  • range(3,6) returns [3, 4, 5],
  • range(0,10,2) returns [0, 2, 4, 6, 8],
  • range(10,0,-1) returns [10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1],
  • range(8,2,-2) returns [8, 6, 4],
  • range(8,2) returns [],
  • range(8,2,2) returns [],
  • range(1,5,-1) returns [],
  • range(1,5,-2) returns [],

and its Python counterpart works exactly the same way (at least in the mentioned cases):

>>> range(4)
[0, 1, 2, 3]
>>> range(3,6)
[3, 4, 5]
>>> range(0,10,2)
[0, 2, 4, 6, 8]
>>> range(10,0,-1)
[10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1]
>>> range(8,2,-2)
[8, 6, 4]
>>> range(8,2)
[]
>>> range(8,2,2)
[]
>>> range(1,5,-1)
[]
>>> range(1,5,-2)
[]

So if you need a function to work similarly to Python's range(), you can use above mentioned solution.

share|improve this answer
    
maybe a couple of additional defensive checks - ensure that the arguments passed are all coercible to numbers and ensure that stop is greater than start (and swap them if not). –  Russ Cam Nov 25 '11 at 18:46
    
@RussCam: Thanks for pointing this out. I did not add defensive checks for types etc., but I implemented reverse order of elements - it now works exactly the same as Python counterpart, when the last param is negative integer. –  Tadeck Nov 25 '11 at 18:59
    
@RussCam: start >= stop leading to an empty array is necessary if the goal is really emulating Python's range. And I'd argue it's more intuitive anyway. –  delnan Nov 25 '11 at 19:11
    
@delnan: Check may be more complex, as simple start >= stop is not enough for this function to behave like range() in Python. I have updated my answer. –  Tadeck Nov 25 '11 at 19:19
    
@delnan - I'm not familiar with the Python implementation. I guess if it's only going to be used by peeps familiar with the Python implementation that it makes sense to emulate it :) –  Russ Cam Nov 25 '11 at 19:27
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In addition to what's already said, Javascript 1.7+ provides support for iterators and generators which can be used to create a lazy, memory-efficient version of range, simlar to xrange in Python2:

function range(low, high) {  
    return {
        __iterator__: function() {
            return {  
                next: function() {
                    if (low > high)
                        throw StopIteration;  
                    return low++;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

for (var i in range(3, 5))  
  console.log(i); // 3,4,5
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+1 Great idea! Could you implement also step argument and test it on the values from my answer? Your answer is great for the applications where we have very specific browsers in mind (it won't work in Google Chrome, Safari and IE version earlier than 9: stackoverflow.com/a/2209743/548696). –  Tadeck Sep 9 '12 at 3:18
    
@Tadeck: ironically, I asked a very similar question recently, check it out - some good answers there. BTW, your code does not pass my test ;( –  gdbdmdb Sep 9 '12 at 11:14
    
Could you share the test data and expected results? I would be happy to improve it, but my tests are 100% passing. Are you saying the code I have given is not properly parsed by script you have placed in this question: stackoverflow.com/q/12173856/548696 ? –  Tadeck Sep 9 '12 at 17:21
    
@Tadeck: nevermind. I tested slices and your code is for ranges. –  gdbdmdb Sep 9 '12 at 19:59
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Here you go.

This will write (or overwrite) the value of each index with the index number.

Array.prototype.writeIndices = function( n ) {
    for( var i = 0; i < (n || this.length); ++i ) this[i] = i;
    return this;
};

If you don't provide a number, it will use the current length of the Array.

Use it like this:

var array = [].writeIndices(10);  // [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
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