Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been struggling with encoding videos using FFMPEG and x264. The output stutters when played back in Quicktime, while in VLC it shows a lot of compression artifacts at the same places Quicktime stutters. So it seems like Quicktime is stuttering because it's trying to suppress the corruption/artifacts.

The videos have a lot of random motion in them, including frames where 75% of the pixels will change at a random interval (the video is software generated so it's truly pseudo-random). The compression seems to be choking in these places where it's likely detecting a "scene cut" incorrectly. It also seems to choke at regular intervals where I guess it's doing a keyframe.

I've based my encoding preset off of the x264-hq preset that comes with FFMPEG. I've tried turning off scene cut detection, and playing with the keyint/g and keyint_min options. Setting g to 1 makes it work, but blows out the filesize. I've tried the lossless presets, but they won't playback at all in Quicktime. Oddly, I haven't had any problems when working with a lower-resolution test video (1440x810).

Here's the preset I have right now, which works, but yields a file that's approximately 60% larger than the (non-working) hq preset yields. Is there any way to improve upon this? The filesize doesn't matter much, I just want something that will playback anywhere and be very high quality.

coder=1
flags=+loop
cmp=+chroma
partitions=+parti8x8+parti4x4+partp8x8+partp4x4+partb8x8
me_method=umh
subq=8
me_range=16
g=1
keyint_min=1
sc_threshold=0
i_qfactor=0.71
b_strategy=1crf=20
qcomp=0.6
qmin=20
qmax=51
qdiff=4
bf=16
refs=4
trellis=1
flags2=+dct8x8+wpred+bpyramid+mixed_refs
wpredp=2

Here's the command:

ffmpeg \
  -r 60 -i "frame-%06d.tiff" \
  -vcodec libx264 -vpre my_preset \
  -threads 0 \
  -r 60 -an -f out.mp4
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Use multi-pass encoding if possible, this will give H264 a chance to detect scene changes and prepare for them.

Why are you setting your sc_threshold to zero?

Don't be too tolerant of large file sizes, stuttering can happen if the instantaneous bitrate exceeds the transfer rate of the storage device (including network). 1080p content should be easily encoded in under 10mbit/sec.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I've been trying a two-pass encode, but the results are even worse: lots of artifacts and more stuttering on "scene changes". I've been starting with the slower_firstpass and slower presets that came with ffmpeg. I set the sc_threshold to zero in the hope of disabling scene changes altogether. –  Ian Dec 5 '11 at 5:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.