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I'm trying to manipulate the HTML through getElementsByClass() but for some reason it doesn't work. When I use document.getElementByID() it works? Why is this?

<div class='boldStuff'> <p>Welcome to the site. </p> </div>

<script type="text/javascript">
    document.getElementsByClass('boldStuff').innerHTML = 'Fred Flinstone';
</script>
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Just an aside: it's "Flintstone", not "Flinstone"... –  nnnnnn Nov 25 '11 at 20:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try:

document.getElementsByClassName('boldStuff')[0]
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1  
getElementsByClassName() is not universally supported. –  Michael Berkowski Nov 25 '11 at 19:16
    
@Michael is there anything else that can get the class being universally supported? –  user172071 Nov 25 '11 at 19:17
1  
This is true, you have to do some error checking or just use jQuery. –  Godwin Nov 25 '11 at 19:17
    
It isn't even available in IE 8. –  Michael Berkowski Nov 25 '11 at 19:17
1  
Also, it returns an array so you have to choose the first element. –  Godwin Nov 25 '11 at 19:18

getElementsByClassName returns a NodeList. you will have to use

document.getElementsByClassName('boldStuff')[0].innerHTML

refer the docs at mdn

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Here's a widely supported solution:

function getElementsByClassName( root, clss ) {

    var result = [], els, i;

    if( arguments.length < 2 || !root || !clss || root.nodeType !== 1 ) {
        return result;
    }

    clss = clss + '';

    if( root.getElementsByClassName ) {
        result = root.getElementsByClassName( clss );
    } else if( root.querySelectorAll ) {
        result = root.querySelectorAll( '.' + clss );
    } else {
        els = root.getElementsByTagName('*');
        clss = " " + clss + " ";
        for( i = 0; i < els.length; ++i ) {
            if( ( " " + els[ i ].className + " " ).indexOf( clss ) !== -1 ) {
                result.push( els[ i ] );
            }
        }
    }
    return result;
}

Then use it like this:

var bold = getElementsByClassName( document, "boldStuff" );

for( var i = 0; i < bold.length; ++i ) {
    bold[ i ].innerHTML = 'Fred Flinstone';
}

The benefit to this is that it uses the native methods wherever possible.

  • It first tries getElementsByClassName because it is generally fastest.

  • Then it tries querySelectorAll, which will bring in support for IE8.

  • Finally, it does a manual filtering of all elements under the provided root.

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Very good code snippet. But, document's node type is 9. You could remove condition root.nodeType !== 1. –  KitKat Mar 5 at 19:38

The correct method to call is getElementsByClassName(), and it will give you an array of elements.

document.getElementsByClassName('boldStuff')

Anyway this is not compatible with older IE version. Check the compatibility here.

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I am pretty sure this only works in Firefox, no? It has been awhile since I've used it - is this supported in all browsers now? –  Logan Serman Nov 25 '11 at 19:16
    
It doesn't work on IE up to 8, only since IE9 it seems to work. –  Jose Faeti Nov 25 '11 at 19:17
    
It isn't even supported in IE8, though it works in IE 9. –  Michael Berkowski Nov 25 '11 at 19:18
    
@Michael exactly what I said. –  Jose Faeti Nov 25 '11 at 19:20
    
@JoseFaeti, yes as I was typing it. You got to the post button first :) –  Michael Berkowski Nov 25 '11 at 19:21

It returns an array so set the first element of the array's innerHTML

document.getElementsByClassName('boldStuff')[0].innerHTML = 'Fred Flinstone';
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