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I am new to css and try to understand the box model. So far my understanding is block level elements have a break at start and end. If i create following html structure

<div class = "outerDiv">
<div class = "innerDiv">
</div>

If i set the background image for both of them then both image appears in one line.

.outerDiv {
background: url(/img/bottom-right.gif) no-repeat right bottom;
padding-bottom: 1em;
}

.innerDiv {
background: url(/img/top-left.gif) no-repeat left top;
}
div {width : 20px;}

They both appears in one line.

If I add text to both the divs, then they appears in different lines

Sorry my question is -

  1. Does empty div with width settings (they are block level elements) do not behave as block level elements, as do not include break as the start and end of the element.

Thanks, Daljit Singh

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As far as I see, you didn't closed one of those divs –  pmerino Nov 25 '11 at 19:34
    
How big are those background images? if they're smaller than the divs, you'll get wonky looking results, even though the placement works fine. –  Marc B Nov 25 '11 at 19:35
    
What exactly is your question? –  Ashok Padmanabhan Nov 25 '11 at 19:36
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1 Answer

<div class = "outerDiv">
  <div class = "innerDiv"></div>
</div>

.outerDiv {
  background: black;
  padding-bottom: 1em;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
}

.innerDiv {
  background: white;
  left: 20px;
  top: 20px;
  width: 20px;
  height: 20px;
  position: absolute;
}

The key is the position: absolute :) it will put the innerdiv inside the outerdiv :)

top and left adjusts where the location of the innerdiv is in the outerdiv

width and height you probably already know :)

You can see a fiddle example here: http://jsfiddle.net/42Duf/

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