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I would like to convert a variable $uptime which is seconds, into days, hours, minutes and seconds.

Example:

$uptime = 1640467;

Result should be:

18 days 23 hours 41 minutes
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9  
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5 Answers 5

This can be achieved with DateTime class

Use:

echo secondsToTime(1640467);
# 18 days, 23 hours, 41 minutes and 7 seconds

Function:

function secondsToTime($seconds) {
    $dtF = new DateTime("@0");
    $dtT = new DateTime("@$seconds");
    return $dtF->diff($dtT)->format('%a days, %h hours, %i minutes and %s seconds');
}

demo

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5  
Respect for its simplicity.. –  Ari Susanto Dec 17 '13 at 15:08
    
@Glavić How would I add support for week and month to this? –  socca1157 Apr 17 at 23:44
    
@socca1157: instead of the used format, use %y years, %m months, %d days, %i minutes, .... If you wish to include weeks, you should calculate it. Example you can see here. –  Glavić Apr 18 at 13:27
    
Be sure to add validation to the function. if (empty($seconds)) { return false;} –  a coder Jun 18 at 20:19
    
@acoder: I think this function should not take care of validation; validation should be setup before function call. Nevertheless, your validation is still wrong, because for example it will also pass alphabet. –  Glavić Jul 3 at 8:31

This is the function rewritten to include days. I also changed the variable names to make the code easier to understand...

/** 
 * Convert number of seconds into hours, minutes and seconds 
 * and return an array containing those values 
 * 
 * @param integer $inputSeconds Number of seconds to parse 
 * @return array 
 */ 

function secondsToTime($inputSeconds) {

    $secondsInAMinute = 60;
    $secondsInAnHour  = 60 * $secondsInAMinute;
    $secondsInADay    = 24 * $secondsInAnHour;

    // extract days
    $days = floor($inputSeconds / $secondsInADay);

    // extract hours
    $hourSeconds = $inputSeconds % $secondsInADay;
    $hours = floor($hourSeconds / $secondsInAnHour);

    // extract minutes
    $minuteSeconds = $hourSeconds % $secondsInAnHour;
    $minutes = floor($minuteSeconds / $secondsInAMinute);

    // extract the remaining seconds
    $remainingSeconds = $minuteSeconds % $secondsInAMinute;
    $seconds = ceil($remainingSeconds);

    // return the final array
    $obj = array(
        'd' => (int) $days,
        'h' => (int) $hours,
        'm' => (int) $minutes,
        's' => (int) $seconds,
    );
    return $obj;
}

Source: CodeAid() - http://codeaid.net/php/convert-seconds-to-hours-minutes-and-seconds-(php)

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It would be nice to include source –  Martin. Nov 25 '11 at 20:19
    
The source is there now ;-) –  Julian Moreno Nov 25 '11 at 20:32
    
would you be kind enough to add days to this function? –  knittledan Apr 13 '12 at 23:50
    
@knittledan, doesnt appear so :) –  smftre May 1 '12 at 12:25
1  
@hsmoore.com I went ahead and figured this out $days = floor($seconds / (60 * 60 * 24)); // extract hours $divisor_for_hours = $seconds % (60 * 60 * 24); $hours = floor( $divisor_for_hours / (60 * 60)); –  knittledan May 1 '12 at 18:20

Here it is a simple 8-lines PHP function that converts a number of seconds into a human readable string including number of months for large amounts of seconds:

PHP function seconds2human()

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1  
Simple yet efficient. Although I didn't like the 'Months' bit. –  Francisco Presencia Jul 10 '13 at 3:31

Although it is quite old question - one may find these useful (not written to be fast):

function d_h_m_s__string1($seconds)
{
    $ret = '';
    $divs = array(86400, 3600, 60, 1);

    for ($d = 0; $d < 4; $d++)
    {
        $q = (int)($seconds / $divs[$d]);
        $r = $seconds % $divs[$d];
        $ret .= sprintf("%d%s", $q, substr('dhms', $d, 1));
        $seconds = $r;
    }

    return $ret;
}

function d_h_m_s__string2($seconds)
{
    if ($seconds == 0) return '0s';

    $can_print = false; // to skip 0d, 0d0m ....
    $ret = '';
    $divs = array(86400, 3600, 60, 1);

    for ($d = 0; $d < 4; $d++)
    {
        $q = (int)($seconds / $divs[$d]);
        $r = $seconds % $divs[$d];
        if ($q != 0) $can_print = true;
        if ($can_print) $ret .= sprintf("%d%s", $q, substr('dhms', $d, 1));
        $seconds = $r;
    }

    return $ret;
}

function d_h_m_s__array($seconds)
{
    $ret = array();

    $divs = array(86400, 3600, 60, 1);

    for ($d = 0; $d < 4; $d++)
    {
        $q = $seconds / $divs[$d];
        $r = $seconds % $divs[$d];
        $ret[substr('dhms', $d, 1)] = $q;

        $seconds = $r;
    }

    return $ret;
}

echo d_h_m_s__string1(0*86400+21*3600+57*60+13) . "\n";
echo d_h_m_s__string2(0*86400+21*3600+57*60+13) . "\n";

$ret = d_h_m_s__array(9*86400+21*3600+57*60+13);
printf("%dd%dh%dm%ds\n", $ret['d'], $ret['h'], $ret['m'], $ret['s']);

result:

0d21h57m13s
21h57m13s
9d21h57m13s
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gmdate("d H:i:s",1640467);

Result will be 19 23:41:07. When it is just one second more than normal day, it is increasing the day value for 1 day. This is why it show 19. You can explode the result for your needs and fix this.

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You can also improve this code like this:$uptime = gmdate("y m d H:i:s", 1640467); $uptimeDetail = explode(" ",$uptime); echo (string)($uptimeDetail[0]-70).' year(s) '.(string)($uptimeDetail[1]-1).' month(s) '.(string)($uptimeDetail[2]-1).' day(s) '.(string)$uptimeDetail[3]; This will also give you year and month informations too. –  Caner SAYGIN Oct 16 at 21:40

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