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I started a small app (C#, .Net4, console app) and it was a basic idea for moving files around at home based on rules.

This app has grown and become extremely useful. So my task is to break it into more reusable classes and smaller projects (class libraries).

I have a generic 'Show' function that accepts a string, and a error_level id. Based on that, I would output text to my console window in a certain colour. All is fine when it's all in one big class, but I want to move a method to it's own class libabry - however, I want it to report updates while it's processing, to my UI (Console window, for now). When I move it to the class, obviously, class to my 'Show' method', break.

Is there a way I can get messages sent from my class method, back to my UI? It's messages like, 'Opened Config file', 'Processing 12 new files', 'Success'.

And as it happens, the UI gets the messages and displays them, while the method finishes it's job.

At the moment, it's a Console App project. My plan is to rip out the working code, keeping the console app for testing, and later, change the 'UI' into a nice WPF desktop application. (I'm trying to learn WPF, and decided to use a small project I started ages ago, and 'skin it').

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would suggest that you add an interface, implement that interface in your UI, and pass a reference to the class that implements the interface to your new classes.

This approach should work if you are performing the work in a single thread or multiple threads.

For example, the interface:

public interface INotify
{
    void Notify(string Msg);
}

the UI:

public class Form1 : INotify
{
        // This is the method where you instantiate the new worker process
        public void DoSomeWork() {
            NewClass Worker = New NewClass(this);
        }

        public delegate void NotifyDelegate(string Msg);

    public void Notify(string Msg)
    {
        txtLog.Text += Msg + Environment.NewLine;
    }

    void INotify.Notify(string Msg)
    {
        this.INotify_Notify(Msg);
    }
    private void INotify_Notify(string Msg)
    {
        if (this.InvokeRequired)
        {
            this.Invoke(new NotifyDelegate(Notify), Msg);
        }
        else
        {
            this.Notify(Msg);
        }
    }
   }

and the new class (just call notify in this class to send the message):

public class NewClass
{
    private INotify m_Notifier;

    private void Notify(string Msg)
    {
        m_Notifier.Notify(Msg);
    }

    public NewClass(INotify oNotifier)
    {
        m_Notifier = oNotifier;
    }
}

Update with alternate implementation

An alternate implementation, which will work with static classes, is to implement a delegate.

For example, here is the delegate:

public delegate void NotifyDelegate(string Msg);

Here is the sample static class for the console app:

static class Program
{
    private static NotifyDelegate m_Notifier;
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        m_Notifier = new NotifyDelegate(Notify);

        NewClass oNewClass = new NewClass(m_Notifier);

        // Your work code here
    }
    static void Notify(string Msg)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(Msg);
    }
}

and a revised version of the work class:

public class NewClass
{
    private NotifyDelegate m_Notifier;

    public void Notify(string Msg)
    {
        m_Notifier.Invoke(Msg);
    }

    public NewClass(NotifyDelegate oNotifier)
    {
        m_Notifier = oNotifier;
    }
}
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Thanks, I am trying this - however, my app at the moment is a console app, so my main Program class is static. When I declare my Notify method, it has to be static in my Program. public static void Notify(string message, Constants.ErrorLevel errorLevel) . The Interface is declared like this: void Notify(string message, Constants.ErrorLevel errorLevel); So, because one is static, and the other isnt, I am getting an error on my UI saying that Notify hasn't been Implimented. How can I get around that? –  Craig Nov 25 '11 at 20:59
    
I have updated the answer to use a delegate instead of an interface to handle your situation. –  competent_tech Nov 25 '11 at 21:23
    
Thanks for that - as I am moving towards a non-static class, when I got WPF, would it be better to go with the Interface based solution, or would the event handler be a suitable solution for both static and non static based projects? –  Craig Nov 25 '11 at 22:29
1  
I think that either one is suitable, although if you execute the workers in non-UI thread, you will want to use the invoke mechanism in the first approach. I personally prefer the interface approach because it feels "cleaner", but I don't really have concrete reasoning for this. –  competent_tech Nov 25 '11 at 22:34

If i understand your question correctly i would implement event handling so that your UI can subscribe to some sort of status event. An alternative would be to use some kind of Logging Framework like NLog and log to a static method in your UI via the methodCall target. Since you are using WPF it would make sense to use MVVM. This would probably be the best way to create powerful and maintainable UIs.

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Could the class/es that do work raise an event that the class on the UI thread is listening to? The 'worker' class would raise an event with some parameters, the listener class would then write that information to the UI.

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Well this is usually done with Binding, you bind your viewModel with the view, and any changes to the viewModel, will be directly displayed in your UI.

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