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I want to put a method in a Ruby module such that it can be called from a class method or an instance method, using simple syntax:

module MyMod
  def fmt *args
    args.map { | a | "You said #{a}" }
  end
end

class MyClass
  include MyMod
  def inst
    puts fmt 1,2,3
  end
  def self.cls
    puts fmt 4,5,6
  end
end

The above doesn't work because the class method (cls) can't see the instance method fmt. If I change the definition to self.fmt, then the instance method has to invoke it as MyMod.fmt.

I'd like to be able to just invoke fmt (some stuff) from both types of method. Is there a "ruby-ish" way of doing this? I can define the module as

module MyMod
  def self.fmt *args
    args.map { | a | "You said #{a}" }
  end
  def fmt *args
    MyMod.fmt args
  end
end

but that's not very DRY, is it? Is there a simpler way?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use advantage of Module#included method to do it like that:

module MyMod
  # here base is a class the module is included into
  def self.included(base)
    # extend includes all methods of the module as class methods
    # into the target class
    base.extend self
  end

  def fmt(*args)
    args.map { |a| "You said #{a}" }
  end
end

class MyClass
  # regular include provides us with instance methods
  # and defined above MyMod#included hook - with class methods
  include MyMod

  def inst
    puts fmt(1, 2, 3)
  end

  def self.cls
    puts fmt(4, 5, 6)
  end
end

puts MyClass.cls
puts MyClass.new.inst

And here's the output:

You said 4
You said 5
You said 6

You said 1
You said 2
You said 3

For more detailed explanation have a look at this article.

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That callback is fine when building something that acts as a kind of DSL that other developers should include into their classes. Otherwise this is a bit too much magic to be justified, as it is not instantly clear that using include will result in class methods being added. So if this is in internal code it's almost always of benefit to manually use extend itself, instead of going through the hassle of documenting that special behaviour. –  Dominik Honnef Nov 25 '11 at 20:37
    
Good point, but if you want to use this module in multiple places I don't think calling both include and extend wherever you need it is a good solution. –  KL-7 Nov 25 '11 at 20:44
    
@KL-7, why not? The module is doing that for you... you don't have to do it. It's the only way anyway. –  d11wtq Nov 25 '11 at 23:12
    
That's exactly what we're discussing though, whether the module should be "doing that for you" or not. And that it's "the only way" is obviously wrong as there's still the "manual" way… –  Dominik Honnef Nov 25 '11 at 23:21
    
Totally missed the first comment, sorry ;) –  d11wtq Nov 25 '11 at 23:57

Both include and extendthe MyMod module in MyClass, so that the fmt method gets added both as an instance and a class method to MyClass.

What Object#extend does is add the methods of a module to a single instance. In this case, that instance is the class itself, which is why the methods will be available as class methods.

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