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I am a C# beginner. I found there are 2 way to write codes and output the same results. Could you explain the different between them? And when to use #1 and #2?

#1

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Program min = new Program();
        Console.WriteLine(min.isMin(1, 2));
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    int isMin(int value1, int value2)
    {
        int Min;
        return Min = Math.Min(value1, value2);
    }
}

#2

class Program2
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(isMin(1, 2));
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static int isMin(int value1, int value2)
    {
        int Min;
        return Min = Math.Min(value1, value2);
    }
}
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4 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The difference between #1 and #2 is that in #1, isMin is an instance member function of the class Program, therefore you have to create an instance of the Program class

 Program min = new Program()

and only then call the instance member function isMin:

 min.isMin(..)


In #2, isMin is a static member function of the Program class, and since Main is also a static member function of the same class, you can make a direct call to isMin from the Main function.

Both are valid. The static function Main is the "entry point" into the program which means it gets executed first. The rest is just Object-Oriented semantics.

EDIT

It seems that in order to better illustrate the point an example would be in order.

The two programs below are pretty useless outside of their intended purpose of showing the differences between encapsulating your program logic into objects, and the alternative -using static functions.

The program defines two operation and will work on two numbers (10 and 25 in the example). As the program runs, it will trace its' operations to a log file (one for each number). It is useful to imagine that the two operations could be replaced by more serious algorithms and that the two numbers could be replaced by a series of more useful input data.

//The instance-based version:
class Program
{
    private System.IO.StreamWriter _logStream;
    private int _originalNumber;
    private int _currentNumber;

    public Program(int number, string logFilePath)
    {
        _originalNumber = number;
        _currentNumber = number;
        try
        {                
            _logStream = new System.IO.StreamWriter(logFilePath, true);
            _logStream.WriteLine("Starting Program for {0}", _originalNumber);
        }
        catch
        {
            _logStream = null;
        }
    }
    public void Add(int operand)
    {
        if (_logStream != null)
            _logStream.WriteLine("For {0}: Adding {1} to {2}", _originalNumber, operand, _currentNumber);
        _currentNumber += operand;
    }
    public void Subtract(int operand)
    {
        if (_logStream != null)
            _logStream.WriteLine("For {0}: Subtracting {1} from {2}", _originalNumber, operand, _currentNumber);
        _currentNumber -= operand;            
    }
    public void Finish()
    {            
        Console.WriteLine("Program finished. {0} --> {1}", _originalNumber, _currentNumber);
        if (_logStream != null)
        {
            _logStream.WriteLine("Program finished. {0} --> {1}", _originalNumber, _currentNumber);
            _logStream.Close();
            _logStream = null;
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Program p = new Program(10, "log-for-10.txt");
        Program q = new Program(25, "log-for-25.txt");

        p.Add(3);         // p._currentNumber = p._currentNumber + 3;
        p.Subtract(7);    // p._currentNumber = p._currentNumber - 7;
        q.Add(15);        // q._currentNumber = q._currentNumber + 15;
        q.Subtract(20);   // q._currentNumber = q._currentNumber - 20;
        q.Subtract(3);    // q._currentNumber = q._currentNumber - 3;

        p.Finish();       // display original number and final result for p
        q.Finish();       // display original number and final result for q
    }
}

Following is the static functions based implementation of the same program. Notice how we have to "carry our state" into and out of each operation, and how the Main function needs to "remember" which data goes with which function call.

class Program
{
    private static int Add(int number, int operand, int originalNumber, System.IO.StreamWriter logFile)
    {
        if (logFile != null)
            logFile.WriteLine("For {0}: Adding {1} to {2}", originalNumber, operand, number);
        return (number + operand);
    }
    private static int Subtract(int number, int operand, int originalNumber, System.IO.StreamWriter logFile)
    {
        if (logFile != null)
            logFile.WriteLine("For {0}: Subtracting {1} from {2}", originalNumber, operand, number);
        return (number - operand);
    }
    private static void Finish(int number, int originalNumber, System.IO.StreamWriter logFile)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Program finished. {0} --> {1}", originalNumber, number);
        if (logFile != null)
        {
            logFile.WriteLine("Program finished. {0} --> {1}", originalNumber, number);
            logFile.Close();
            logFile = null;
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int pNumber = 10;
        int pCurrentNumber = 10;
        System.IO.StreamWriter pLogFile;
        int qNumber = 25;
        int qCurrentNumber = 25;
        System.IO.StreamWriter qLogFile;

        pLogFile = new System.IO.StreamWriter("log-for-10.txt", true);
        pLogFile.WriteLine("Starting Program for {0}", pNumber);
        qLogFile = new System.IO.StreamWriter("log-for-25.txt", true);
        qLogFile.WriteLine("Starting Program for {0}", qNumber);

        pCurrentNumber = Program.Add(pCurrentNumber, 3, pNumber, pLogFile);
        pCurrentNumber = Program.Subtract(pCurrentNumber, 7, pNumber, pLogFile);
        qCurrentNumber = Program.Add(qCurrentNumber, 15, qNumber, qLogFile);
        qCurrentNumber = Program.Subtract(qCurrentNumber, 20, qNumber, qLogFile);
        qCurrentNumber = Program.Subtract(qCurrentNumber, 3, qNumber, qLogFile);

        Program.Finish(pCurrentNumber, pNumber, pLogFile);
        Program.Finish(qCurrentNumber, qNumber, qLogFile);
    }
}

Another point to note is that although the first instance-based example works, it is more common in practice to encapsulate your logic in a different class which can be used in the Main entry point of your program. This approach is more flexible because it makes it very easy to take your program logic and move it to a different file, or even to a different assembly that could even be used by multiple applications. This is one way to do that.

// Another instance-based approach
class ProgramLogic
{
    private System.IO.StreamWriter _logStream;
    private int _originalNumber;
    private int _currentNumber;

    public ProgramLogic(int number, string logFilePath)
    {
        _originalNumber = number;
        _currentNumber = number;
        try
        {                
            _logStream = new System.IO.StreamWriter(logFilePath, true);
            _logStream.WriteLine("Starting Program for {0}", _originalNumber);
        }
        catch
        {
            _logStream = null;
        }
    }
    public void Add(int operand)
    {
        if (_logStream != null)
            _logStream.WriteLine("For {0}: Adding {1} to {2}", _originalNumber, operand, _currentNumber);
        _currentNumber += operand;
    }
    public void Subtract(int operand)
    {
        if (_logStream != null)
            _logStream.WriteLine("For {0}: Subtracting {1} from {2}", _originalNumber, operand, _currentNumber);
        _currentNumber -= operand;            
    }
    public void Finish()
    {            
        Console.WriteLine("Program finished. {0} --> {1}", _originalNumber, _currentNumber);
        if (_logStream != null)
        {
            _logStream.WriteLine("Program finished. {0} --> {1}", _originalNumber, _currentNumber);
            _logStream.Close();
            _logStream = null;
        }
    }        
}


class Program
{        
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ProgramLogic p = new ProgramLogic(10, "log-for-10.txt");
        ProgramLogic q = new ProgramLogic(25, "log-for-25.txt");

        p.Add(3);         // p._number = p._number + 3;
        p.Subtract(7);    // p._number = p._number - 7;
        q.Add(15);        // q._number = q._number + 15;
        q.Subtract(20);   // q._number = q._number - 20;
        q.Subtract(3);    // q._number = q._number - 3;

        p.Finish();
        q.Finish();     
    }
}
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Or, since he's a beginner it may be worth noting that you could use the more terse syntax: (new Program()).isMin(1, 3); –  BobbyShaftoe May 5 '09 at 23:48
    
Of course, there are many ways to skin the C# cat. You could also call Program.isMin(1, 2) since isMin is a static method. On a minor point, it's not recommended practice to begin methods with lowercase - call it IsMin(). –  Darren Oster May 5 '09 at 23:51
3  
Just do yourself a favor early on, and learn when to create static methods and when not to. There's nothing worse than a developer who thinks they know OO programming, and creates all of their classes with nothing but static methods. It drives me up a wall! –  Jagd May 6 '09 at 0:06
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The key difference here is based on object oriented programming. C# is an object oriented language, and most of the things in it are objects. In this case Program is an object. It is special because it has the static void Main() function, that is the 'entry point' for the program.

The difference comes because of the static modifier on the isMin function. Classes define how the objects work. When you actually make one, as you do with new Program() you have 'instantiated', or made an actual working copy of that object.

Usually this is done to track a set of variables that are part of that object, but in this case there are no such variables.

In the first case, you are making an instance of the object program, and telling it to execute its "isMin" function on that instance. In the second case, you are not making any instances, and you are telling it to execute the "isMin" function that is associated with the class (not the instance of the object). There is no real difference here except some easier syntax, because there is no data being tracked in an object.

You will find that it matter when you have data on the objects, because you will not be able to access 'instance' data when you are in a static function. To understand more, look into object oriented programming.

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The two methods are differentiated by of an instance method (in the first) and a static method (in the second). The first declares an instance of the Program class, and then calls the isMin method on this instance, whereas the second simply calls the isMin method without referring to any instance (you can think that the method always belongs to the class as a whole and is executed within this general context). If you come from a BASIC background, a static method is essentially like a method defined in a module.

As far as best practices go, the second method is the one to choose. There's no explicit reason to have an instance of the Program class (consider that you will never have more than one in the same assembly/process), so why bother? It makes more sense that the isMin method should be static, i.e. not depending on or even related to any particular instance (or any particular class even - you might as well define it in another class called MathHelper).

Hope that clarifies things for you.

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The difference between the two is that the first uses instance methods and the second uses static methods. An instance method is a method that is associated with every object of a given class. A static method is associated with the class itself. In the first case you have to create an object of the class, then you can use the method associated with that particular object. In the second case, you can use the method based on just the class. Normally, you would prefix the method with the class name, but because the scope you are in is the class, the class of the static method is assumed to be the current class. That explains what the difference is at a very high level.

The more important thing is how you would actually go about writing a program using these methods. In object-oriented programming you normally think of an object as containing some data and the operations (methods) that operate on that data. In a sense, it is self-contained. The typical way of writing OO programs is to use classes with instance methods. Static methods would typically be rare, at least comparatively rare.

Why would that be? Well, static methods have to get all their data from their arguments as they aren't associated with any particular object. Remember that objects consist of data AND operations. Sometimes we have methods that this works for. The Math class is a good example. Typically it's methods are static and take one or two arguments and produce a result. There's no need for an object since the only data required are the arguments to the method and it wouldn't make sense to create a class to hold two arguments and then only do one operation on them.

Normally, though, our class data is more complex and the various operations on them are not as simple and more numerous. In this case it makes sense to have the methods operate on the object's data rather than pass all that data around via parameters. In this case we need particular instances of a class so that we can have particular data for the operations to operate on.

As Brian Marick says, now would be a good time for an example.

Let's say you had a class that represented a car and were running a simulation of many cars driving around a town. Cars have many potential operations: Start, Accelerate, Turn, Brake, etc. A car would also have several properties that might affect the various algorithms for these operations: an Engine, a BrakePackage, SteeringPackage, etc. Not every car would have the same values for Engine, BrakePackage, and SteeringPackage.

Using instance methods we would let the methods: Start, Accelerate, Turn, Brake operate on the data contained in the object itself.

public class Car
{
    public Engine Engine { get; set; }
    public BrakePackage Brakes { get; set; }
    public SteeringPackage Steering { get; set; }
    public double X { get; private set; }
    public double Y { get; private set; }
    public double Z { get; private set; }

    public void Accelerate( double pedalPressure )
    {
        this.Engine.MoveThrottle( pedalPressure, UpdatePosition );
    }

    public void UpdatePosition( double x, double y, double z, int deltaTime )
    {
        this.CalculateSpeed( this.X, this.Y, this.Z, x, y, z, deltaTime );
        this.X = x;
        this.Y = y;
        this.Z = z;
    }

    ...
}

On the other hand if we used static methods then we'd have to pass in all the various parameters to the methods, including those values that we want to be updated because the methods wouldn't be associated with any particular data. It's actually painful enough that I don't even want to type out the example that would be equivalent to the above.

In a sense, it's unfortunate that you need to start out writing a program using a static Main method because it can get you started on the wrong foot. What you want to do is start thinking about your objects -- what data they need and what operations you would perform on them. Every once in a while you'll find that you have an operation that applies to all objects of a class and doesn't need to access any or much of the data in any particular object or only deals with information about the class itself. Those objects will be candidates for static methods. Most of your methods, however, will fit the pattern of your first example, not your second.

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