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When I use preprocessor directives like

1 #if(DEBUG)
2 // 1
3 // 2
4 #else
5 // 1
6 // 2
7 #endif
8
9 logger.Debug("Log exception, etc."); 

it causes that at runtime the line numbers in the log (eg. stack trace) are incorrect - in the above example line 9 would become 4 because the rest would be parsed by the preprocessor.

It makes log analysis quite difficult.

Is there a way to solve this issue without creating methods with ConditionalAttribute?

I'm aware of Debugger.IsAttached (and I'm using this solution now) but I would prefer to run code based on the build mode (debug/release) not on whether the debugger is attached.

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2  
I write C# code like this all the time, and when I logger.Debug("Exception:" + exception), the line numbers in the exception trace come out correct - they match the original source file. I suspect something else is wrong. Give us a real example, not one like this that wouldn't actually throw an exception. –  Ross Patterson Nov 26 '11 at 14:17
    
I checked again in a completely separate project and you're right, the exception trace is correct. Unfortunately I already refactored my (large) project with Debugger.IsAttached and the problem went away so I (groundlessly as it turns out) suspected that preprocessor directives were the issue. Maybe the .pdb were not in sync with the binaries. Since I'm unable to reproduce the issue now I consider it solved. Thanks for the comment. It's good to know that this scenario is supported. –  surfen Nov 26 '11 at 16:44
3  
Please copy your comment an as answer and accept it. –  LarsTech Nov 27 '11 at 1:26

2 Answers 2

I have the same issue but instead of preprocessor directives, I have seen this happen with partial classes. Wondering if partial classes is the cause of the issue.

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In my experience I've been using partial classes and the tracelines were correct. I suspect that pdb in the program directory might have been outdated. It's important to have an up-to-date pdb file because this is where the line numbers are stored... –  surfen Sep 1 at 7:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I checked again in a completely separate project and as Ross Patterson suggests, the exception trace is correct.

Unfortunately I already refactored my (large) project with Debugger.IsAttached and the problem went away so I (groundlessly as it turns out) suspected that preprocessor directives were the issue. Maybe the .pdb were not in sync with the binaries.

Since I'm unable to reproduce the issue now I consider it solved. It's good to know that this scenario is supported. Thanks Ross Patterson!

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