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I have a DOSEMU process running on Linux (Mint 11). The process modify data over the network, and I'm afraid that if a user close the program using the [X] button of the window instead of properly shutdown the program, then the shared data can be corrupted.

In Windows, I can use NoClose to disable the [X] close button. Is there any way to do it in Linux?

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vague guess: maybe by modifying ~/.Xresources to hide the button? –  Marc B Nov 25 '11 at 21:33
    
If that's your worry, I'd be equally worried if someone trips over the network cable while that data transfers is going on.. –  nos Nov 25 '11 at 21:44
    
@nos: no, I'm not worried about any user unplugging the network on purpose, but I personally saw several users closing the program with the [x] button. –  PabloG Nov 25 '11 at 21:52

1 Answer 1

Use -t switch to run DOSEMU not in a window but inside your console. There is no need to run it from X at all - you can just switch to a text-mode console (Ctrl-Alt-1...6) and run dosemu -t from there, your users will never notice it.

You could also run

sudo nohup dosemu -t your_command

and close your console safely - it would result in DOSEMU execute your_command in the background in case you don't need to do manual input

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dosemu -t almost do the trick, it shows the [x] button but when I click over it a "process running" warning pops up. I suppose that the popup is enough warning to the user, but it will be better if I could disable the button completely. The nohup options doesn't work for me, I do "nohup sudo dosemu" but I can close the window with the [x]. –  PabloG Nov 25 '11 at 22:02
    
sorry, nohup really doesn't work with DOSEMU b/c it requires user input –  Oleg Mikheev Nov 25 '11 at 22:39

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