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According to N3290 std::unique_ptr accepts a deleter argument in its constructor.

However, I can't get that to work with Visual C++ 10.0 or MinGW g++ 4.4.1 in Windows, nor with g++ 4.6.1 in Ubuntu.

I therefore fear that my understanding of it is incomplete or wrong, I can't see the point of a deleter argument that's apparently ignored, so can anyone provide a working example?

Preferably I'd like to see also how that works for,

unique_ptr<Base> p = unique_ptr<Derived>( new Derived )

Possibly with some wording from the standard to back up the example, i.e., that with whatever compiler you're using, it actually does what it's supposed to do?


EDIT: Some folks have commented and even voted, flame-war like, that this question is impossible to answer. I haven't edited the original text above. Quoting from the last three paragraphs of that, I was asking for "a working example?" of a custom deleter for unique_ptr, and "preferably also" how that works for upcasts, and "possibly with some wording from the standard".

That turned out to be so simple to answer that a good answer was given after a very short time, and curiously, the votes that it was impossible, and the claims that it was impossible to answer, came after that answer was given; they came after that answer was selected as "solution".

Partly I'm writing this edit to make people think a little more. To not behave as idiots, voting to close as unanswerable a question that is (1) very simple and straightforward and (2) has already been answered, for God's sake.

EDIT 2: the other partial reason for writing the above edit, is now covered by the amendment of Howard's answer.

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3  
Here's my favourite use. Deleting objects with private destructors is another use. –  Kerrek SB Nov 25 '11 at 21:52
2  
What do you mean by "doesn't work"? Doesn't compile? Objects don't get deleted? –  Billy ONeal Nov 25 '11 at 21:59
6  
@Alf: I've read your question, all comments, all answers, and the link Billy provided. I still can't tell what trouble you had, what you were expecting, nor why the design seems "contrary to C++ "don't pay for what you don't use"". I'm tempted to recommend to vote this to close because it is not a real question, but I wanted to first give you a chance to clarify. –  Howard Hinnant Nov 26 '11 at 3:03
5  
Alf: wow. Thanks for that. I can see now how the accepted answer really shows how a derived class unique_ptr upcasted to a base class unique_ptr does work if written properly. Not to mention other things you demand in your "question". Strange how ~20K rep all of a sudden removes the "requirement" of "what have you tried so far" and "post your code and result, and your expected result". –  rubenvb Nov 26 '11 at 11:55
2  
@rubenvb: I think your comment is an attempt at irony. But it really is the case that the selected answer (as well as the others, and not the least Kerrek's pure comment) do show all that. It's just not spelled out and fed to the reader by teaspoon. It's enough for me though. Cheers & hth., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 26 '11 at 12:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 26 down vote accepted

This works for me in MSVC10

int x = 5;
auto del = [](int * p) { std::cout << "Deleting x, value is : " << *p; };
std::unique_ptr<int, decltype(del)> px(&x, del);

And on gcc 4.5, here

I'll skip going to the standard, unless you don't think that example is doing exactly what you'd expect it to do.

share|improve this answer
    
The gcc link is broken, can someone regerate the code? What is the difference in gcc? –  alfC Jan 25 at 3:21
    
@alfC: There is no difference. It's the exact same code as shown in my answer. The link was just an online demonstration of the code compiling and running. I've updated it. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 25 at 3:28
    
Why not just "std::unique_ptr<int, decltype(del)> px(&x);" ? –  Jon May 29 at 2:43
    
@Jon: Because lambda types do not have default constructors. –  Benjamin Lindley May 29 at 2:51
    
@Benjamin: Any idea why it works in VS2013? It's a pity that "del" has to be specified twice, and that we have to create an instance when all we really wanted was a type. –  Jon May 29 at 3:19

Note: the original answer is below the divider line.

With permission from Howard I (Alf) am amending this answer showing why the presented code has Undefined Behavior, and giving a concrete crash example.

Since this invalidates most of the original answer I am placing this text in front, to avoid people reading just the start of the original answer and being misled. However, buried within the original was this important info:

The sizeof unique_ptr is the same as that for auto_ptr and T* if you default the deleter, or specify a stateless deleter. If you specify a “stateful” deleter (such as a function pointer), then extra memory is stack-allocated to store the state of your deleter.

That said, the issue is

  • how to create a unique_ptr<T> custom deleter that will correctly destroy the referee even after the unique_ptr<T> has been moved to a unique_ptr<BaseOfT>.

This was one important reason for my question, e.g. it pertains to use of unique_ptr for the PIMPL idiom.

First note that an object’s address depends on the type that it’s accessed as:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct Base { int x; };
struct Derived: Base { virtual ~Derived() {} };

int main()
{
    Derived*    p1  = new Derived;
    Base*       p2  = p1;

    cout << "As Derived at " << p1 << ", as Base at " << p2 << ".\n";
}

Testing that with Visual C++ 10.0 and MinGW g++ 4.4.1:

d:\dev\test\hh> cl changing_address.cpp /Fe"b"
changing_address.cpp

d:\dev\test\hh> b
As Derived at 00721A50, as Base at 00721A54.

d:\dev\test\hh> g++ changing_address.cpp

d:\dev\test\hh> a
As Derived at 0x351728, as Base at 0x35172c.

d:\dev\test\hh> _

This type-specific address is sometimes surprising even to seasoned C++ professionals.

The change of address occurs because the address as Base object must be the address of the first byte of the Base sub-object in Derived. And both compilers used above placed the Base sub-object somewhere other than at the very start of the Derived object. Apparently they chose to place a vtable pointer at the start, followed by the Base sub-object; anyway, with the Base sub-object not at the very start of the Derived object, and hence with different address.

Because of the address change, when a unique_ptr<Base> passes its owned pointer (of type Base*) to a deleter function taking void* argument, the deleter function can receive a different address, a different void* value, than for an original Derived* pointer value.

The effect of a cast to Derived* can then be different than the original Derived* pointer, and any attempt to use the referred to object, such as via delete, then has Undefined Behavior.

For example, the code below, using the original answer’s apparently simple deleter function scheme, crashes:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>       // std::unique_ptr
#include <utility>      // std::forward

struct Base { int x; };
struct Derived: Base { virtual ~Derived() {} };

template< class Type >
void deleteFuncImpl( void* p )
{
    delete static_cast< Type* >( p );
}

#if defined( USE_CPP11_ARGUMENT_FORWARDING )
template< class T, class ...Args >
std::unique_ptr< T, void(*)(void*) >
    make_ptr( Args&& ...args )
{
    return std::unique_ptr< T, void(*)(void*) >(
        new T( std::forward<Args>( args )... ),
        &deleteFuncImpl< T >
        );
}
#endif

template< class T >
std::unique_ptr< T, void(*)(void*) > make_ptr()
{
    return std::unique_ptr< T, void(*)(void*) >(
        new T(),
        &deleteFuncImpl< T >
        );
}

int main()
{
    std::unique_ptr< Base, void(*)(void*) >  p = make_ptr< Derived >();
}

The crash:

d:\dev\test\hh> g++ hh_02.cpp -std=c++0x -o hh_02

d:\dev\test\hh> hh_02

d:\dev\test\hh> _

Windows 7 "stopped working" dialog

I gave a simple fix in my comment-as-answer, which this original answer from Howard was a response to.


Original answer including update:

Had your question contained your answer, or some code that at least attempted your answer, I (or someone else) might have offered the code below as a far simpler, clearer, and less obfuscated alternative:

// Your Base and Derived
// ..

template< class Type >
void deleteFuncImpl( void* p )
{
    delete static_cast< Type* >( p );
}

int main()
{
    unique_ptr< Base, void(*)(void*) >  p( new Derived, deleteFuncImpl<Derived> );
    cout << p->message() << endl;
}

Base:<init>
Derived::<init>
Message from Derived!
Derived::<destroy>
Base::<destroy>

Among those familiar with unique_ptr, it is well known that one can get many of the benefits of a dynamic deleter by using a function pointer as the static deleter type, with no need whatsoever to wrap the function pointer nor the deleter up in auxiliary classes.

And note that this is functionality that you pay for only if you use it. The sizeof unique_ptr is the same as that for auto_ptr and T* if you default the deleter, or specify a stateless deleter. If you specify a "stateful" deleter (such as a function pointer), then extra memory is stack-allocated to store the state of your deleter.

Naturally it should be emphasized that the default_deleteer, used with unique_ptr<Base> is stateless (adds no overhead), should you choose to follow the time-tested design of making ~Base virtual.

...
virtual ~Base() { cout << "Base::<destroy>" << endl; }
...

int main()
{
    unique_ptr< Base >  p( new Derived );
    cout << p->message() << endl;
    assert(sizeof(unique_ptr< Base >) == sizeof(Base*));
}

Base:<init>
Derived::<init>
Message from Derived!
Derived::<destroy>
Base::<destroy>

The above is truly the zero-overhead solution since Base already has a virtual function (message) and thus making ~Base() virtual does not add significant additional overhead to Base.

A dynamic deleter (like shared_ptr's) was suggested for unique_ptr several times during standardization. And while a unique-owning smart pointer with a dynamic deleter does have use cases, it is overkill for the use cases unique_ptr was designed for. One of the chief use cases for unique_ptr is to safely replace auto_ptr. If unique_ptr had a dynamic deleter, it would have overhead above that of auto_ptr, and thus not been capable of completely replacing auto_ptr. And we subsequently would have been unable to deprecate auto_ptr and its attendant error-prone use in generic code (moving with copy syntax).

Update

There is some concern of the use of void* in the function that does the deleting. One way to correct this is to make the parameter Type*:

template< class Type >
void deleteFuncImpl( Type* p )
{
    delete p;
}

This doesn't work in the OP's code because the unique_ptr<Derived> is cast to a unique_ptr<Base> and subsequently will be passing a Base* to a Derived* at destruction time, which won't implicitly convert.

Another solution would be to give deleteFuncImpl two parameters:

template<class Base, class Type >
void deleteFuncImpl( Base* p )
{
    delete static_cast< Type* >( p );
}

But that's ridiculously awkward, and really no better than the original void* solution.

Finally one may note that one can not possibly have undefined behavior if in this statement:

unique_ptr< Base, void(*)(void*) >  p( new Derived, deleteFuncImpl<Derived> );
                                           ^^^^^^^                 ^^^^^^^

the two underlined types are the same. The best way to enforce this is to create a factory function:

template <class T, class ...Args>
std::unique_ptr< T, void(*)(void*) >
make_ptr(Args&& ...args)
{
    return std::unique_ptr<T, void(*)(void*)>
                           (new T(std::forward<Args>(args)...),
                            deleteFuncImpl<T>);
}

which can be used like this:

std::unique_ptr< Base, void(*)(void*) >  p = make_ptr<Derived>();

Now, even though deleteFuncImpl takes its parameter by void*, we know a-priori that the run time type of deleteFuncImpl<T> argument is a T*, thus eliminating the possibility of a mismatch between the run time type of the held object, and the static_cast within the deleter function.

In this updated solution, the sizeof unique_ptr is two words. I would like to emphasize once more though that the optimal solution, both in space, and clarity of coding, is to give Base a virtual destructor. In this optimal solution the sizeof unique_ptr is one word, the same as for a raw pointer.

The function-pointer-deleter solution should be reserved for cases where making a virtual ~Base() is not meaningful. Examples include the use of std::free and std::close as the deleter.

Finally, on the suggestion that one use std::function<void(something-I'm-not-sure-what)>:

A std::function<void(something-I'm-not-sure-what)> can be "null". And so can a function pointer. However unique_ptr is specifically formulated to make accidentally assigning a null function pointer unlikely, whereas it does not have such safety protocols in place to protect against a null std::function. This compiles and crashes at run time:

std::unique_ptr<int, std::function<void(void*)>> p(new int(3));

terminate called without an active exception
Abort trap: 6

But this catches the error at compile time:

std::unique_ptr<int, void(*)(void*)> p(new int(3));

error: static_assert failed "unique_ptr constructed with null function pointer deleter"

Additionally std::function adds expense over a function pointer as noted by Johannes Schaub in the comments of this answer.

std::function not only adds a speed and likely size overhead compared to a function pointer, but in this case is also more error prone.

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1  
-1 Your solution has formal Undefined Behavior in general (although not for the particular example). Consider the case where Base is non-polymorphic while Derived is polymorphic. Then the upcast can easily change the address, which when passed to void* and casted to Derived yields UB. Also, I did not like your tone, neither in the comments nor in this answer. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 26 '11 at 15:55
1  
@DeadMG like the answer explains it would add overkill over a simple function pointer. Simple pointers have no copy/move constructors that need virtual calls to clone the type-erased parts. The whole point is that shared_ptr forces you to use type erased deleters, while unique_ptr does not. Using std::function in the example would be counter productive for the answer. I agree about the void* part though, that looks like it needs to be fixed in order to avoid the UB cases. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 26 '11 at 16:37
1  
@Alf: As my solution was formed by copy/pasting your solution and throwing away the parts that didn't add any benefit. Your complaint applies to your solution as well. Your complaint reinforces the problem I had with your question though: way too vague. Even now your question/problem-statement seems to be drifting. As for tone: I have yet to state that your dialog here does not reflect well on you. Nor have I second-guessed your motivations. I have attempted to educate, and correct some inaccurate statements concerning the efficiency and storage of unique_ptr compared to a raw pointer. –  Howard Hinnant Nov 26 '11 at 22:28
1  
@Howard: your code does not work: it is simpler code, yes, but only because it is incorrect. you can make code arbitrary simple if it does not need to be correct. the solution i presented had no "parts that didn't add any benefit", it was not "obfuscated", and there was and is nothing "vague" about it. when you wrote that first, it may just have been an honest mistake, but when you write it now, knowing that it's false, it is a lie. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 26 '11 at 22:43
2  
@Alf: Ah, I see, removing all virtual functions from Base causes the pointer shift. Nicely pointed out. For PIMPL I still recommend a virtual destructor in Base. Then unique_ptr just works out of the box. –  Howard Hinnant Nov 27 '11 at 19:43

To complement all previous answers, there is a way to have a custom deleter without having to "pollute" the unique_ptr signature by having either a function pointer or something equivalent in it like this:

std::unique_ptr< MyType, myTypeDeleter > // not pretty

This is achievable by providing a specialization to the std::default_delete template class, like this:

namespace std
{
template<>
class default_delete< MyType >
{
public:
  void operator()(MyType *ptr)
  {
    delete ptr;
  }
};
}

And now all std::unique_ptr< MyType > that "sees" this partial specialization will be deleted with it. Just be aware that it might not be what you want for all std::unique_ptr< MyType >, so chose carefully your solution.

share|improve this answer
    
isn't writing code in namespace std bad practice? –  PorkyBrain Dec 5 '13 at 22:50
    
Specializing std templates is legal and not a bad practice, but there are "rules" you need to follow, see this post. std::default_delete is the perfect candidate for template specialization. –  Philippe Cayouette Dec 6 '13 at 3:38

My question has been pretty well answered already.

But just in case people wondered, I had the mistaken belief that a unique_ptr<Derived> could be moved to a unique_ptr<Base> and would then remember the deleter for the Derived object, i.e., that Base would not need to have a virtual destructor. That was wrong. I'd select Kerrek SB's comment as "the answer", except one cannot do that for a comment.

@Howard: the code below illustrates one way to achieve what I believed the cost of a dynamically assigned deleter had to mean that unique_ptr supported out of the box:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>           // std::unique_ptr
#include <functional>       // function
#include <utility>          // move
#include <string>
using namespace std;

class Base
{
public:
    Base() { cout << "Base:<init>" << endl; }
    ~Base() { cout << "Base::<destroy>" << endl; }
    virtual string message() const { return "Message from Base!"; }
};

class Derived
    : public Base
{
public:
    Derived() { cout << "Derived::<init>" << endl; }
    ~Derived() { cout << "Derived::<destroy>" << endl; }
    virtual string message() const { return "Message from Derived!"; }
};

class BoundDeleter
{
private:
    typedef void (*DeleteFunc)( void* p );

    DeleteFunc  deleteFunc_;
    void*       pObject_;

    template< class Type >
    static void deleteFuncImpl( void* p )
    {
        delete static_cast< Type* >( p );
    }

public:
    template< class Type >
    BoundDeleter( Type* pObject )
        : deleteFunc_( &deleteFuncImpl< Type > )
        , pObject_( pObject )
    {}

    BoundDeleter( BoundDeleter&& other )
        : deleteFunc_( move( other.deleteFunc_ ) )
        , pObject_( move( other.pObject_ ) )
    {}

    void operator() (void*) const
    {
        deleteFunc_( pObject_ );
    }
};

template< class Type >
class SafeCleanupUniquePtr
    : protected unique_ptr< Type, BoundDeleter >
{
public:
    typedef unique_ptr< Type, BoundDeleter >    Base;

    using Base::operator->;
    using Base::operator*;

    template< class ActualType >
    SafeCleanupUniquePtr( ActualType* p )
        : Base( p, BoundDeleter( p ) )
    {}

    template< class Other >
    SafeCleanupUniquePtr( SafeCleanupUniquePtr< Other >&& other )
        : Base( move( other ) )
    {}
};

int main()
{
    SafeCleanupUniquePtr< Base >  p( new Derived );
    cout << p->message() << endl;
}

Cheers,

share|improve this answer
1  
can you explain what use it has to have a class with a non-virtual destructor, yet derive from it and wanting to get the derived destructor called through the base pointer? Doesn't this go against common sense about virtual destructors? –  stijn Jun 18 '12 at 8:53
3  
@stijn: As long as some other mechanism (such as a custom deleter) does the job of identifying the most derived class, the destructor doesn't technically need to be virtual. One valid reason for then making it non-virtual, is to retain compatibility with an externally imposed memory layout, i.e. you don't want a vtable ptr in there at the front of the memory region. Another valid reason is that if destruction is always supposed to be through a deleter, then making the destructor virtual would incorrectly indicate that one could use C++ delete, or at least that there was some reason for it. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 18 '12 at 10:42
    
@stjn Another reason is where you are using multiple techniques of memory allocation/deallocation, and you only want the creation point to know about the allocation policy/technique for that particular instance. It is then useful to track the correspondingly correct dtor along with the smart pointer, so that other code points that interact with that smart pointer do not then need to know about the allocation/deallocation policy at compile time. In this context, it is a form of information hiding and reducing code duplication (DRY). –  Preet Kukreti Mar 14 '13 at 9:09

This works. The destruction happens properly.

class Base
{
    public:
     Base() { std::cout << "Base::Base\n"; }
     virtual ~Base() { std::cout << "Base::~Base\n"; }
};


class Derived : public Base
{
    public:
     Derived() { std::cout << "Derived::Derived\n"; }
     virtual ~Derived() { std::cout << "Derived::~Derived\n"; }
};

void Delete(const Base* bp)
{
    delete bp;
}

int main()
{
    std::unique_ptr<Base, void(*)(const Base*)> ptr = std::unique_ptr<Derived, void(*)(const Base*)>(new Derived(), Delete);
}
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