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I am creating a reversi game for my intro CS class.

I found an error in SearchN() that would cause it to give false playableN flags and created isSame() as a work around.

Now the game is crashing when I attempt a move.

I have the bug isolated to isPlayable() which causes the program to stop running without error message.

I thought it was because the program was searching out of bounds; however, when i run .isPlayable(0,0) it returns a NullPointerException (also something I don't quite know how to get rid of).

So it must be some error with handling un-played spaces.

Anyone have any thoughts?

/**
 * a method to return the color of a tile
 *@params    x    y    tile coordinates 
 */
public Color getColor(int x, int y){
  try{
    return buttons[x][y].getBackground();
  }
  catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e){
    return null;
  }
}

/**
 * a method to determine whether a tile has been played
 *@params    x    y    tile coordinates 
 */
public boolean isPlayed(int x, int y){
  if(this.isBlack(x,y) || this.isWhite(x,y)){
    return true;
  }else{ 
    return false;
  }
}


/**
 * a method to determine whether a tile has a color opposite to a given color
 *@params    x    y    c    tile coordinates and color to compare
 */
  public boolean isOpposite(int x, int y, Color c){
    if(this.isPlayed(x,y)){
      return(!(this.getColor(x,y).equals(c)));
    } else
      return false;                                    // this was giving the false playableN flag
  }

/**
 * a method to determine weather a tile has the same color as the one given
 *@params    x    y    c    tile coordinates and color to compare
 */
  public boolean isSame(int x, int y, Color c){
    if(this.isPlayed(x,y)){
      return(this.getColor(x,y).equals(c));
    }else{
      return false;
    }
  }

/**
 * a method used to check tiles north of an attempted play to verify legal moves
 *@params    x    y    c    tile coordinates and comparing color
 */
  public void searchN(int x, int y, int increment, Color c){
    if(increment>1 && (this.isSame(x-increment,y, c))){
      playableN = true;
      leadN = false;
    } else {
      if(this.isOpposite(x-increment,y,c)){
        leadN=true;
      }
    }
  }

/**
 * a method used to determine if a tile is playable
 *@params    x    y    tile coordinates
 */
  public boolean isPlayable(int x, int y){
    this.searchN(x,y,1,turnColor);
    // search 7 other directions
    while(leadN||leadNE||leadE||leadSE||leadS||leadSW||leadW||leadNW){ 
      int i = 2;
      if(leadN)
        this.searchN(x,y,i,turnColor);
        // search 7 other directions
      i++;
    }
    if(playableN||playableNE||playableE||playableSE||playableS||playableSW||playableW||playableNW)
      return true;
    else
      return false;
  }

** all tiles are black, white or the default tile color (green) and in a 2D array of JButtons displayed in gridLayout().

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I see two ways that a NullPointerException could be happening:

You are getting an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException in getColor. In that case you are catching the exception and returning null.

or

getBackground is returning null.

In either case getColor will return null, which causes a NullPointerException to be thrown when you call .equals in isOpposite or isSame.

You should check the result of getColor before attempting to calls .equals on it. Then you should figure out why getBackground is returning null or ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException is being thrown.

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1  
He's getting the ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException because of how his searchXX() methods are written. I don't know if I want to spoil the rest. –  Clockwork-Muse Nov 26 '11 at 0:11
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Because @goto10 already gave the direction you need to look, here are some other notes:

  • You need to learn better separation of concerns. Specifically, you're mixing your display code with your game-rule code. With proper design, almost all programs should be runnable from a command line - a GUI is solely there to help out the end-user.

  • When you have two (or more) related parameters, you really have a single one - a composite class containing them. For example, your x and y parameters for searching your array really represent one CoordinatePair, Location, or Point instance. Although the likelihood is small here, this will help avoid issues in the future - what happens if somebody accidentally swaps the y and increment parameters in searchN(), for example? Code up an immutable Point class and use that - it'll completely remove that problem:

    public final class Point {
       // Yes, public variables are almost universally frowned upon, with good reason.
       // Here, though, it's kind of the 'point'
       public final int x;
       public final int y; 
    
       // Note: private constructor - can't call this from outside.
       private Point(final int x, final int y) {
          this.x = x;
          this.y = y;
       }
    
       // Static factory method for construction instead.
       // It is left as an exercise for the reader to implement caching.
       public static Point fromCoordinates(final int x, final int y) {
          return new Point(x, y);
       }
    }
    

    You'll need to implement a good .hashCode() and .equals() method to make this work, but what Eclipse (or any of the other good tools) spits out should be good. There are some performance considerations with using immutable objects, but for your needs here it's not an issue.

  • Strive to make methods have as few side-effects as possible; that is, try to make them modify as little (preferably NO) external state as possible. This includes state that is part of your object (such as leadN) but is not otherwise 'part' of the method. Side-effects make it extremely difficult to 'reason' (figure out what's going on) about the state of an object, and make good testing an actual nightmare. Writing methods that depend solely on the (hopefully immutable) state of the objects passed in, and the immutable state of the 'host' (this) object may be somewhat more difficult, but much more easy to reason about; systems that are almost all (or perhaps completely) immutable are much easier to think about, and you get thread-safety/parallel execution for free.

  • Your methods .isSame() and .isOpposite() are a bit hacked together because the only difference between a played/unplayed square is it's color. The relevant rule-side code should be unaware of display-side code - there's no such thing as a green-sided piece (there technically isn't a white or a black piece either - there's a piece for player 1, and a piece for player 2. Even in the physical world, it's a display only effect, and rules which read 'white gets 4.5 extra points' really mean 'the player who goes second gets 4.5 extra points'). Also, those two methods don't return inverse results for un-played squares (.isSame() returns false), which isn't logical.

  • Whenever you have a long list of similar elements (the leadX and playableX variable sets), try and reformat them into an actual list. This would also help immensely if you wanted to make a 3D version... Also, there's a way to use what's known as the Strategy Pattern (along with a hash map or array list) to make moving/searching in different directions far easier.

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