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I know that a lot of people meet this error. I did do search work but it seems that this error msg appears in all different situations. Could you please tell me what's wrong? Basically this class stores an int array of a long input. THis error is in the function num()

and another error:

main.cpp:43: error: invalid conversion from ‘num*’ to ‘long int’
main.cpp:43: error:   initializing argument 1 of ‘num::num(long int)’

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;
//ifstream fin;
//ofstream fout;
class num 
{
     public:
     int dig[9];
      void breakDown(long input)
     {   
             for(int digPos=0;input>0;digPos++)
             {   
                     dig[digPos]=input-((int)input/10)*10;
                     input=(int)input/10;
             }   
     }   
     num(long in) // constructor
     {   
             breakDown(long in);
     }   
     int outPut()
     {   
             for(int digPos=0;digPos<9;digPos++)
             {   
                     cout << dig[digPos];
             }   
             return 0;
     }    
};

//int init()
//{
//      fin.open("runround.in",ifstream::in);
//      fout.open("runround.out");
//}


int main()
{
//        init();
     num num1=new num((long)81236);
}
share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The error is here:

num(long in) // constructor
{   
    breakDown(long in);
}

change it to this:

num(long in) // constructor
{
    breakDown(in);
}

You don't specify types when you call a function.


The other error is here:

num num1=new num((long)81236);

new num returns a pointer. But you are assigning it to a num object - which is incompatible.

You have two options here:

num num1((long)81236);

This will create a num object locally on the stack.

The other option is:

num *num1 = new num((long)81236);

This will allocate a num object on the heap. But you need to free it later with delete.

share|improve this answer
    
could you please see another error? thanks! – YankeeWhiskey Nov 26 '11 at 2:49
    
I found the other error. Updating my answer... – Mysticial Nov 26 '11 at 2:51
    
Thanks! I follow your advice and get rid of the error. I'm just saying, is num num1=new num((long)81236); legal in java? I think I messed the two language up.... – YankeeWhiskey Nov 26 '11 at 2:56
    
Yes, that would be legal in Java. In C++, there's a distinction between an object and pointer to an object. – Mysticial Nov 26 '11 at 2:58

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