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In Python 2.7's documentation, three rules about Unicode are described as follows:

If the code point is <128, it’s represented by the corresponding byte value.

If the code point is between 128 and 0x7ff, it’s turned into two byte values between 128 and 255.

Code points >0x7ff are turned into three- or four-byte sequences, where each byte of the sequence is between 128 and 255.

Then I made some tests about it:

>>>> unichr(40960)

u'\ua000'

>>> ord(u'\ua000')

40960

In my view, 40960 is a code point > 0x7ff, so it should be turned into three- or four-byte sequences, where each byte of the sequence is between 128 and 255, but it only be turned into two-bytes sequence, and the value '00' in u'\a000' is lower than 128, not matched with the rules mentioned above. Why?

What's more, I found some more Unicode characters, such as u'\u1234', etc. I found that the value ("12" && "34") in it is also lower than 128, but according to the thoery mentioned first, they shouldn't be lower than 128. Any other theories that I lost?

Thanks for all answers.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

in python2.7's documentation, three rules about unicodes are described as follows:

That is a description of the UTF-8 encoding.

Then I made some tests about it:

\ua000 is an escape sequence representing a Unicode character. The a000 is a hexadecimal representation of the numerical code point value. It has nothing to do with UTF-8 encoding.

You get UTF-8 encoding when you explicitly encode a unicode string using the UTF-8 encoding.

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Correct. \ua000 is an escaped hex encoding, not the byte representation in UTF-8. The poster needs to review UTF-8 encodings. –  Anony-Mousse Nov 26 '11 at 9:21
    
Thanks, I consult some documentations about UTF-8 && Unicode, and finally know the relations between them. –  MarkZar Nov 26 '11 at 10:56

Your quote apparently comes from Unicode HOWTO (you really should have told us where it came from, with a link if possible) and describes UTF-8. It does not claim that this is how Python 2.7 represents Unicode characters, in fact it does the opposite:

Under the hood, Python represents Unicode strings as either 16- or 32-bit integers, depending on how the Python interpreter was compiled.

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Those rules only apply for UTF-8. Python uses UCS-2 or UCS-4 internally, which have fixed sizes.

"The Absolute Minimum Every Software Developer Absolutely, Positively Must Know About Unicode and Character Sets (No Excuses!)"

... and the value '00' in u'\a000' is lower than 128, not matched with the rules mentioned above.

I don't even want to know why you think they can be split up like this...

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1  
The internal representation isn't actually relevant to the question. The point is that UTF-8 encoding is not reflected in the syntax for Unicode string literals. –  Karl Knechtel Nov 26 '11 at 8:43
    
@Karl: Fair enough. But the article is still relevant (and what I said is still true regardless of its relevance). –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 26 '11 at 8:45
    
Oh, no disagreement there :) –  Karl Knechtel Nov 26 '11 at 8:45

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