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I am following a tutorial that teaches me how to use win32 sockets(winsock2). I am attempting to create a simple socket that connects to the "localhost" but my program is failing when I attempt to connect to the local host(at the function connect()).

Do I need admin privileges to connect to the localhost? Maybe thats why it fails? Maybe theres a problem with my code? I have tried the ports 8888 & 8000 & they both fail.

Also if I change the port to 80 & connect to www.google.com I can connect BUT I get no response back. Is that because I haven't sent a HTTP request or am I meant to get some response back?

Here's my code (with the includes removed):

// Constants & Globals //
typedef unsigned long IPNumber;    // IP number typedef for IPv4
const int SOCK_VER    = 2;
const int SERVER_PORT = 8888;  // 8888
SOCKET mSocket        = INVALID_SOCKET;
SOCKADDR_IN sockAddr  = {0};
WSADATA wsaData;
HOSTENT* hostent;


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    // Initialise winsock version 2.2
    if (WSAStartup(MAKEWORD(SOCK_VER,2), &wsaData) != 0)
    {
        printf("Failed to initialise winsock\n");
        WSACleanup();
        system("PAUSE");
        return 0;
    }

    if (LOBYTE(wsaData.wVersion) != SOCK_VER || HIBYTE(wsaData.wVersion) != 2)
    {
        printf("Failed to load the correct winsock version\n");
        WSACleanup();
        system("PAUSE");
        return 0;
    }

    // Create socket
    mSocket = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, IPPROTO_TCP);
    if (mSocket == INVALID_SOCKET)
    {
        printf("Failed to create TCP socket\n");
        WSACleanup();
        system("PAUSE");
        return 0;
    }


    // Get IP Address of website by the domain name, we do this by contacting(??) the Domain Name Server
    if ((hostent = gethostbyname("localhost")) == NULL)  // "localhost"  www.google.com
    {
        printf("Failed to resolve website name to an ip address\n");
        WSACleanup();
        system("PAUSE");
        return 0;
    }

    sockAddr.sin_port             = htons(SERVER_PORT);
    sockAddr.sin_family           = AF_INET;
    sockAddr.sin_addr.S_un.S_addr = (*reinterpret_cast <IPNumber*> (hostent->h_addr_list[0]));
    // sockAddr.sin_addr.s_addr=*((unsigned long*)hostent->h_addr);  // Can also do this

    // ERROR OCCURS ON NEXT LINE: Connect to server
    if (connect(mSocket, (SOCKADDR*)(&sockAddr), sizeof(sockAddr)) != 0)
    {
        printf("Failed to connect to server\n");
        WSACleanup();
        system("PAUSE");
        return 0;
    }

    printf("Got to here\r\n");
    // Display message from server
    char buffer[1000];
    memset(buffer,0,999);
    int inDataLength=recv(mSocket,buffer,1000,0);
    printf("Response: %s\r\n", buffer);

    // Shutdown our socket
    shutdown(mSocket, SD_SEND);

    // Close our socket entirely
    closesocket(mSocket);

    // Cleanup Winsock
    WSACleanup();

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
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2  
Do you have something listening on that port on your machine? (And yes, you need to send an HTTP request if you want a webserver to send you stuff.) –  Mat Nov 26 '11 at 9:33
    
no, I dont have anything listening, I kindof thought that the local host would just respond lol –  Jake M Nov 26 '11 at 9:35
2  
@JakeM please inform us when localhost "just responds", so we can name it Skynet and call the Terminator. Keep your computer away from the Big Red Button. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 26 '11 at 9:42
    
It will respond if you connect to a port that has a service listening, and the used protocol does not require you to talk first. For example, if I write in my linux machine: telnet localhost 22 (that is the SSH port) it will reply SSH-2.0-OpenSSH_5.8p1 Debian-7ubuntu1 without delay. –  rodrigo Nov 26 '11 at 21:58
    
It did "just respond". With a "port unreachable" ICMP packet, telling you that there is no socket listening on that port. Which the sockets library converted to a failure return code from connect. –  Ben Voigt Oct 3 '13 at 15:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Someone should be listening in the port you are connecting to. Try writing a small server program that will listen for incoming connections. If connect succeeds obviously you are connected to google but you need to send a HTTP request (from C? - that would be difficult).

share|improve this answer
    
Libcurl can help hide some nastinesses of writing HTTP requests in C. –  moshbear Nov 26 '11 at 10:16
1  
Not so difficult: const char *msg = "GET / HTTP/1.0\r\n\r\n"; send(sock, msg, strlen(msg), 0);. If you want to use HTTP 1.1 the minimum request would be "GET / HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: www.google.com\r\n\r\n". –  rodrigo Nov 26 '11 at 21:52

As you're willing to use the TCP-Protocol wich is connection based you will need a communication counterpart such as an application listening on port 8888 to respond to your connection initiation request (SYN-Packet in TCP Terms)

You could use the unix tool netcat (which is also availibla for other OS') to do so without the need of admin privileges...

nc -l 8888

... wich opens a listening socket on port 8888 on your local machine

However, on unix systems you aren't allowed to listen on so called well known ports without admin privileges.

For more information read about the TCP Connection Life-Cycle

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In order to connect to a TCP port on localhost, someone has to be listening on that port on your machine.

Apart from writing your own server there is a simple way to get some programs listening: Install the "Simple TCP/IP Services" feature on your machine. This will give you a "Quote of the day" server on port 17, a Daytime server on port 13, a Chargen server on port 19 and an echo server on port 7.

In order to install this, go to your "Programs and Features" or "Add/Remove Programs" or whatever it's called on your Windows, select "Turn Windows features on or off" and find and install the "Simple TCPIP Services" in the list.

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