Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Why I receive an error when I try to create a property to another class through a pointer like that:

#ifndef SQUARE_H
#define SQUARE_H

#include <string>
//using namespace std;

    #include "Player.h"

class Square

{
public:

    Square(int); 
    void process();

protected:

    int ID;
    Player* PlayerOn;          <---

};



    #endif

and the Player class is :

    #ifndef PLAYER_H
    #define PLAYER_H

    #include <string>
//using namespace std;

    #include "Square.h"

class Player
{
public:

    Player(int,int);
//  ~Player(void);
    int playDice();


private:

        int ID;
        int money;


};
#endif

I receive:

syntax error missing ; before * (on the declaration of  Player* PlayerOn;)

and missing type specifier (on the same line...)

share|improve this question
1  
Your post hurts my eyes, could you put the code for each file into code blocks, instead of splitting them up into several? –  Chris Parton Nov 26 '11 at 9:40
2  
Why have you included Square.h in Player.h? –  Mark Nov 26 '11 at 9:40
    
@Mark that's the cause of his error (due to the #ifdefs), you might want to put that in an answer :) –  Seth Carnegie Nov 26 '11 at 9:41
1  
Damn, I can't answer now. I don't want to steal any upvotes from Mark haha. –  Chris Parton Nov 26 '11 at 9:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The issue is that you are inclding Square.h in Player.h and so when you get Player* PlayerOn; Player is not defined

Either do not have the #include "Square.h" in your Player.h which will work with this code. If the actual code is more complex replace the #include "Square.h" with a forward declaration of Square class Square;

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, you are correct, but I think in Java the superfluous imports do not cause a problem, do they? –  arjacsoh Nov 26 '11 at 9:53
2  
Java and C++ are different languages so it does not matter what Java does for this question. - there are several reasons why java imports don't behave in this way –  Mark Nov 26 '11 at 9:58

Looks like a problem of recursive includes. You should use forward declaration in your square class.

#ifndef SQUARE_H
#define SQUARE_H

#include <string>
//using namespace std;

class Player; //You will have to use the #include "player.h" in your .cpp

class Square

{
public:

    Square(int); 
    void process();

protected:

    int ID;
    Player* PlayerOn;          <---

};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.