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I have used this accepted answer to set my editor in Terminal. Unfortunately it only sets for a single session which means every time I reopen Terminal I have to set it again.

I would like to set it once and never have to do it again. Just so you are aware, I'm using GNU Nano.

Thanks!

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Why the close vote? –  Eric Brotto Nov 26 '11 at 16:42
    
Sensibly enough — your question is not exactly programming related and it will feel comfortable after emigration to superuser. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 26 '11 at 17:24
    
Good point Michael. Indeed I debated it myself and am now clearler on the issue. Will try not to make the same mistake again. –  Eric Brotto Nov 26 '11 at 17:33
    
It is beyond me, though, why is it voted for migration to serverfault and superuser. But being a server superuser myself I hardly know this fine line myself :) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 26 '11 at 17:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Put the command into your ~/.bashrc file.

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if Eric is using bash, that is. –  Michael Dautermann Nov 26 '11 at 11:18
    
He is probably using default for mac os x, which is bash. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 26 '11 at 11:26
    
@hacker he is not using osx. –  gadgetmo Nov 26 '11 at 13:34
    
@gadgetmo Why tag then? –  Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 26 '11 at 14:24
    
@hacker Apologies. I didn't see that. –  gadgetmo Nov 26 '11 at 15:01

I think, and I will be swiftly and pedantically corrected if I am wrong, but; putting that in your ~/.profile will be executed by any shell, ~/.bash_profile will be executed by bash I generally only ever edit my .profile on Mac ,or my .bashrc on Linux...

From my understanding the difference between bashrc and bash_profile, is that the bashrc gets called for new interactive terminals or when you start bash... Even from bash, and bash_profile is called for login terminals...

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