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Here is a tcpdump hex output of a captured packet.

Command used was ..

$ tcpdump -X -s0 protochain <portno> 

0x0000:  6000 0000 0080 3220 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0x0040:  0000 0000 0000 0001 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0x0090:  6174 6500 0000 0329                      ........

these ... could be anything they are respective ascii charaters corresponding to the specified hex characters. I need to extract the middle hex portion.

I need output in the following format. Please suggest me something on this.

6000 0000 0080 3220 0000 0000 0000 0000
0000 0000 0000 0001 0000 0000 0000 0000
6174 6500 0000 0329 

I tried this one but that seems incorrect ..

cut -d ":" -f2 tmp_packet.txt | awk -F " " '{printf "%s %s %s %s %s %s %s %s 
\n",$1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8}' > packet.txt

tried something with cut -b also but that is giving weird output.

If possible suggest something with awk NRand NF. I am new to awk so do not know much about them.

I tried this and get those ... as output.

cut -d ":" -f2 tmp_packet.txt | awk -F " " '{printf "%s\n",$NF}' > packet.txt

output :

................
................
........

Is there any way using awk to print all the columns except the last one (that is to print everything except the above specified).

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1  
Simple way would be to just do hexdump of your raw pcap. hexdump -x raw.pcap | awk '{$1="";print}' –  jaypal singh Nov 26 '11 at 11:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Cut by spaces: cut -d " " -f 3-10

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that won't work for third line because 7th field delimited by space would be those .... in the output –  Udit Gupta Nov 26 '11 at 10:42
    
@UditGupta: Have you tested that? –  Kerrek SB Nov 26 '11 at 10:49
    
okkk.. that worked out but the reason why I did not tested is because this one does not worked out cut -d ":" -f2 tmp_packet.txt | awk -F " " '{printf "%s %s %s %s %s %s %s %s \n",$1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8}' > packet.txt. so if possible please explain when cut and wak both are taking dlimiter as space then why their output differ –  Udit Gupta Nov 26 '11 at 11:04
    
cut doesn't collapse spaces. Runs of spaces count as multiple fields. Note that this is much faster than grep because you don't need to do any complex matching at all. –  Kerrek SB Nov 26 '11 at 11:07
2  
@Jaypal: There's a time and a place for awk, and I'm sure you'll get your chance to shine before long! :-) –  Kerrek SB Nov 26 '11 at 11:20

You can try using grep as:

egrep -o '([0-9]{4} ){1,8}'  input

See it

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Nicely done Sir! Simplistic Solution. +1 :) –  jaypal singh Nov 26 '11 at 11:05

Your AWK Solution - awk '{for(i=2;i<=9;i++) printf $i" ";printf "\n"}' file | sed 's/\.*//g'

[jaypal~/Temp]$ cat file
0x0000:  6000 0000 0080 3220 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0x0040:  0000 0000 0000 0001 0000 0000 0000 0000  ................
0x0090:  6174 6500 0000 0329                      ........

[jaypal~/Temp]$ awk '{for(i=2;i<=9;i++) printf $i" ";printf "\n"}' file | sed 's/\.*//g'
6000 0000 0080 3220 0000 0000 0000 0000 
0000 0000 0000 0001 0000 0000 0000 0000 
6174 6500 0000 0329 

Another way of printing via AWK -

[jaypal~/Temp]$ awk '{$1="";$10=""; print}' file | sed 's/\.*//g'
 6000 0000 0080 3220 0000 0000 0000 0000 
 0000 0000 0000 0001 0000 0000 0000 0000 
 6174 6500 0000 0329  
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This might work for you:

sed 's/.\{9\}\(.\{39\}\).*/\1/' file

or if you want to remove trailing spaces:

sed 's/.\{9\}\(.\{39\}\).*/\1/;s/\s*$//' file
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