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I have some jQuery code that I would like reviews and pointers on on how to bring its line count down and shorten.

$('#p1').click(function() {
    $('#list').fadeOut(450);
    $('#q1').delay(600).fadeIn(450)
});
$('#p2').click(function() {
    $('#list').fadeOut(450);
    $('#q2').delay(600).fadeIn(450)
});
$('#p3').click(function() {
    $('#list').fadeOut(450);
    $('#q3').delay(600).fadeIn(450)
});
$('#p4').click(function() {
    $('#list').fadeOut(450);
    $('#q4').delay(600).fadeIn(450)
});

...

$('#p12').click(function() {
    $('#list').fadeOut(450);
    $('#q12').delay(600).fadeIn(450)
});
$('#p13').click(function() {
    $('#list').fadeOut(450);
    $('#q13').delay(600).fadeIn(450)
});

Can this code be better optimised? Or at least made less verbose?

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closed as not constructive by cHao, zzzzBov, casperOne Nov 28 '11 at 1:38

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
Oh man, this is a real massacre with false answers because of scope issues in a loop. Does anyone have a good link to one of the many questions here about that issue? –  Thilo Nov 26 '11 at 11:17
7  
So this is a Code Review, yes? –  random Nov 26 '11 at 15:03
2  
@AnnaLear: No, please don't. This is a perfectly good question for Stack Overflow. A very specific problem was pointed out in the code (too repetitive) and the OP asked how to fix that. And looking at all the discussion about it, it was very informative for everyone here, started a discussion about using ids versus classes, about using event delegation, and about variable scope in JS. –  Thilo Nov 26 '11 at 23:30
4  
@Thilo I'm not saying this is a bad question in any way. But, we do have an SE site specifically for this kind of thing, so it's at least partially my job to make that known. –  Anna Lear Nov 26 '11 at 23:54
8  
The OP wanted a code review. Simple as that. Refactoring and reducing lines is part of what Code Review is about. This is a chunk of code that wanted to be smaller. Saying no one goes to Code Review because we're all here is self-defeating and narrow-minded. @thi –  random Nov 27 '11 at 0:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 67 down vote accepted

You can use a for loop, but you should make sure the loop counter's value gets into a correct scope for click event handler:

var clickHandler = function(k) {
    return function() {
        $('#list').fadeOut(450);
        $('#q' + k).delay(600).fadeIn(450);
    };
};
for (var i = 1; i < 14; ++i) {
    $('#p' + i).click(clickHandler(i));
}

Otherwise the delay and fadeIn would get applied to #q13 element exclusively, since actual counter (with its final value of 13) would get into closure.


EDIT: Since quite a lot of answers got it wrong here, I'll attempt to explain more precisely what's going on in this code, as it seems to be pretty confusing.

The "natural" solution with injecting the click handler directly into loop would be the following:

for(var i = 1; i < 14; i++) {
    $('#p'+i).click(function() {
        $('#list').fadeOut(450);
        $('#q'+i).delay(600).fadeIn(450)
    });
}

But this is not at all equivalent to the extended form, which lists all the 13 variants one after another. The problem is that while there are indeed 13 functions created here, they are all closed over the same variable i, whose value changes. It finally arrives at the value of 13 and the loop ends.

Some time later the functions attached to #p1...#p13 elements are called (when one of those elements are clicked) and they use that final value of i. This results in only #q13 being animated.

What needs to be done here is to do something called lambda lifting and eliminate the free variable i, whose value gets inadvertly changed. A common technique for that is to provide a "factory function" which accepts value for our variable and outputs an actual function which we'll use as event handler:

var clickHandler = function(k) {
    return function() {
        $('#list').fadeOut(450);
        $('#q' + k).delay(600).fadeIn(450);
    };
};

Since the scope of k parameter is local to clickHandler, every call to clickHandler gets different k variable. The function returned from clickHandler is therefore closed over different variables, which can in turn have different values. This is exactly what we need. We can then call clickHandler from our loop, passing it the counter's value:

for (var i = 1; i < 14; ++i) {
    $('#p' + i).click(clickHandler(i));
}

I hope this makes the difference somewhat clearer.


EDIT: As Esailija pointed out in the comments, it is also possible to use jQuery.each to achieve similar effect:

$.each(new Array(13), function(idx) {
    $('#p' + (idx + 1)).click(function() {
        $('#list').fadeOut(450);
        $('#q' + idx).delay(600).fadeIn(450);
    });
});

This is probably the solution of choice if you're already aware of the closure/scoping issue I've tried to outline above.

share|improve this answer
4  
+1 only answer that takes care of scope... –  pimvdb Nov 26 '11 at 11:03
3  
You could just use jQuery.each which takes care of it naturally –  Esailija Nov 26 '11 at 11:11
5  
jQuery.each is all fine and dandy, but I think at some point every JavaScript programmer needs to understand what exactly is going on here. And while for this particular example it would do trick, in general it has its own catches (such as probably different referent of this inside and outside of jQuery.each "loop") that you should bear in mind while using it. –  Xion Nov 26 '11 at 11:27
2  
@Xion, just using the factory function hardly explains it either, it's just a RY way of doing the same thing. My comment was made before you edited your post to have an explanation. this is used in the onclick handler, which has nothing to do with the way you loop it - it will be the element either way once the onclick is called. –  Esailija Nov 26 '11 at 11:33
5  
No, it will not. Putting var local inside the for loop doesn't change its scope. It's still local within the function, not the loop block. JavaScript doesn't have block scope at all. Try the following simple example in your browser's console to see it for yourself: a = []; for (var i = 0; i < 2; ++i) { var local = i; a.push(function() { alert(local); }); } Invoking a[0]() and a[1]() will both result in alert with 1, rather than 0 and 1, respectively. –  Xion Nov 26 '11 at 17:11

The ideal solution, IMO, contrary to the accepted answer, is not to base your code around relationships between id values, but to base it around relationships in the DOM. jQuery provides you with an index method, that allows you to see where your element is in relation to its siblings. You can then use this value to select the appropriate other element to show.

This does, of course, require you to structure your HTML in a semantic way. For instance:

<div id="list">
    <a href="#">Link 1</a>
    <a href="#">Link 2</a>
    <a href="#">Link 3</a>
    <a href="#">Link 4</a>
    <a href="#">Link 5</a>
    <a href="#">Link 6</a>
    <a href="#">Link 7</a>
    <a href="#">Link 8</a>
</div>
<div id="questions"> <!-- perhaps this is what q stands for... -->
    <div>1 ...</div>
    <div>2 ...</div>
    <div>3 ...</div>
    <div>4 ...</div>
    <div>5 ...</div>
    <div>6 ...</div>
    <div>7 ...</div>
    <div>8 ...</div>
</div>

The first link applies to the first nested div, the second to the second, etc. The markup is simple, easy to read and clearly semantic.

Your code can then be very simple, with no need to worry about factories. Indeed, the nicest way to do it is with event bubbling and delegation, handled admirably by jQuery's on method (in 1.7; before this, use delegate).

$('#list').on('click', 'a', function() {
    $('#list').fadeOut(450);
    $('#questions div').eq($(this).index()).delay(600).fadeIn(450);
});

Working jsFiddle (I know the animation looks a little clunky, sorry.)

$(this).index() finds the relation of the current element in relation to its siblings. .eq() filters the selection (of #questions div elements) to find the element in the corresponding position.

The code may not be quite as fast (if you use id values, it will almost certainly be mildly faster), but your markup is simpler and therefore more robust.

share|improve this answer
    
While I agree that DOM data is an ugly hack, it will scale much better with larger set of elements especially when we are talking mouseovers or events where performance is more critical. So far for acceptable performance in those situations the cleanest solution I have found is unique hashes so the index lookup stays fast but it's still pretty ugly. Still +1 though since we are talking small amount of elements and a simple click here :) –  Esailija Nov 26 '11 at 23:54

If you must insist on not using event delegation and classes then:

$.each( new Array(13), function(index){
    $('#p'+(index+1) ).click(function() {
        $('#list').fadeOut(450);
        $('#q'+(index+1)).delay(600).fadeIn(450)
    });
});

Using classes and delegation:

$( document ).delegate( ".my-class", "click", function(){
var idIndex = this.id.match( /\d+$/, )[0];

        $('#list').fadeOut(450);
            $('#q'+idIndex).delay(600).fadeIn(450)

});
share|improve this answer
    
Before someone downvotes for using a class: there is efficiency benefit of using classname delegation instead of some overly complex trick selector as it needs to be evaluated every time the document is clicked. –  Esailija Nov 26 '11 at 11:27
    
almost +1 for classes, but you are still using ids for matching the two corresponding p and q. Presumably that can also be done with classes and relative positions in the document. –  Thilo Nov 26 '11 at 11:36
1  
@Thilo, it's probably more efficient to get the id directly instead of comparing document positions each time. And since the id's are there anyway, why not use them :) At least +1 for the new Array trick if anything :D –  Esailija Nov 26 '11 at 11:39
    
The id are probably not there anyway, but had to be added for just this animation (just my assumption, of course). –  Thilo Nov 26 '11 at 11:41
1  
+1 for using classes and event delegation! For folks who don't want regex, they could do this if the prefer $('#'+this.id.replace('p','q')). –  RightSaidFred Nov 26 '11 at 14:09

Like others, you can use a for-loop to do this, but you are actually bounding yourself to 14 ps and whenever you add a new p you need to increase your for-loop test condition.

This is what I would do:

$("[id^=p]").bind("click", function() {
    $('#list').fadeOut(450);
    $('#q' + $(this).attr("id").match(/^#p(\d+)$/i)[1]).delay(600).fadeIn(450)
})
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for avoiding the closure problem entirely, even though you are using regexes which some may consider a problem in itself ;-) –  Xion Nov 26 '11 at 11:56

Couldn't you just use a class instead of all these different ids? And then some navigation to find the matching other element?

$('.myCoolEffect').click(function(event) {
    $('#list').fadeOut(450);
    // find the matching element based on this on somehow
    $(event.currentTarget).up(1).delay(600).fadeIn(450);
});
share|improve this answer
1  
Where did you get .up from? –  pimvdb Nov 26 '11 at 11:39
    
.up is just an example. Presumably there is some kind of fixed way to navigate from p5 to q5 in the document. –  Thilo Nov 26 '11 at 11:42

Try this,

$('[id^="p"]').live('click', function(e){
    var temp = this.id.match(/^p(\d+)$/);
    if(temp){
       $('#list').fadeOut(450);
       $('#q' + temp[1]).delay(600).fadeIn(450);
    }

});

I have used jqueryStartsWith Selector & live function.

Update:

As, Xion commented, If you use this code, it will affect the all other elements of whose id's are starting with p.

If you could add more characters in the id means, this will not be a problem.

Update 2:

As, BrunoLM mentioned in the comment, i have changed the code slightly to not to trigger the event for other elements on the dom that are having the id starts with p.

The var temp = this.id.match(/^p(\d+)$/); and the following if block takes care of other elements of whose id is starts with p.

match(/^p(\d+)$/) returns null for the id's like pblabla, p2sdad, pdasds2323 and it returns an array for the id's like p1, p2, ... p100000....

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3  
Note that this way (as well as the one posted by Munim) assumes that there are no other elements whose id starts with 'p' - a tough call, I'd say. It would be more reasonable to introduce a class for #pN elements and select on it. –  Xion Nov 26 '11 at 11:58
    
@Xion: Updated man! :) –  Tamil Vendhan Kanagaraju Nov 26 '11 at 12:12
1  
you could check the id against /^p(\d+)$/ before continuing with the event. –  BrunoLM Nov 26 '11 at 15:10
$('div').filter(function () {
  return this.id.match(/^p([0-9]+)$/);
}).click(function () {
  $('#list').fadeOut(450);
  $('#' +$(this).attr('id').replace('p','q')).delay(600).fadeIn(450)
});
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