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This is a quote from http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/exists-and-not-exists-subqueries.html: "If a subquery returns any rows at all, EXISTS subquery is TRUE, and NOT EXISTS subquery is FALSE. For example:

SELECT column1 FROM t1 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT * FROM t2);

Traditionally, an EXISTS subquery starts with SELECT *, but it could begin with SELECT 5 or SELECT column1 or anything at all. MySQL ignores the SELECT list in such a subquery, so it makes no difference."

What do the last two sentences mean? Can I have an example of why this is important? I've realized that regardless of what I use in my initial SELECT, I get all columns in my result sets. Is that what this is talking about?

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It means you can write your query as: SELECT column1 FROM t1 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1/0 FROM t2); and still work the same in most RDBMS. –  ypercube Nov 26 '11 at 11:16
    
Whatever you write in the subquery SELECT, after the subquery is evaluated, you either have: SELECT column1 FROM t1 WHERE True or SELECT column1 FROM t1 WHERE False so your outer query either returns all rows or none at all. –  ypercube Nov 26 '11 at 11:17
    
@ypercube Yes, I noticed this unusual behavior. Is there any way to return only a set of rows if the condition is met? –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 26 '11 at 11:29

5 Answers 5

These sentences are not about the SELECT column... part but ONLY about the ... EXISTS (SELECT *... part. The two sentences tell you that the following statements are equivalent:

SELECT column1 FROM t1 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT * FROM t2);
SELECT column1 FROM t1 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 5 FROM t2);
SELECT column1 FROM t1 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 42 FROM t2);
SELECT column1 FROM t1 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT random() FROM t2);
SELECT column1 FROM t1 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT column FROM t2);
SELECT column1 FROM t1 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT NULL FROM t2);
SELECT column1 FROM t1 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1/0 FROM t2);

No more no less.

Since your returned relation is specified in the first SELECT column1 part, the second SELECT has no influence on the returned rows.

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Yes, I don't think it should have any influence on the returned rows. The returned rows should be decided in the initial select statement, correct? But to discover if a column, or row?, exists should be inside the EXISTS subquery, should it not? So, shouldn't the result set be different between SELECT 5 and SELECT 42, for example, if a column 5 exists and a column 42 does not? –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 26 '11 at 11:37
    
To clear up the terminology: the EXISTS part decides whether or not a row from the "outer" SELECT is returned. What parts of that row are actually transferred back to you is decided by the first SELECT. Because the example is very simple and the second SELECT has no filter (WHERE clause) of its own effectively all rows from t1 are returned - because the complete WHERE EXISTS (...) evaluates always to true for each row in t1. –  A.H. Nov 26 '11 at 12:45
    
So basically it's saying, "Return the entire column if there's a row with *, 5, 42, ..., 1/0 in t2." And it's not saying, "Return the rows from t1.column1 where *, 5, 42, ..., 1/0 is in t2," right? Either way, it's incredibly confusing: "Return t1.column1 where there's something in t2." That's like saying, "Give me all the oranges where there's an apple in my apple tree." What does that even mean, you know? –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 28 '11 at 5:02

The last two sentences are basically saying that, as long as the subquery returns something that is NOT an empty table, then what you put in that SELECT statement is moot as you are merely checking for existence. Example:

SELECT DISTINCT store_type FROM stores
  WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 'poop' FROM cities_stores
                WHERE cities_stores.store_type = stores.store_type);

We will get poop for every row that is returned in the second SELECT. Again, as long as there exists at least one row in cities_stores where store_type equals the initial SELECT's store_type, then that table WILL exist.

Importance? In this example, say we own a lot of stores of varying types. All of a sudden we want to know all the different store types that we have in existence with a couple of caveats: the store type is a type found in a city (represented by cities_stores), and also NOT ones that are in the works, but the ones that actually are open (represented by our stores table). Well, we would use this query to get a list of all the store_types.

And the reason you are getting all the columns is because of the *, which means all columns in the table(s) you SELECTed FROM.

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What I put in which SELECT statement The sooner or the latter of the two? What's the terminology for the initial SELECT statement and the final SELECT statement that differentiates them? Not being able to identify that was perhaps the primary issue from the beginning, but there's a definite lack of detail, and therefore clarity, in the manual on this page. –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 26 '11 at 11:39
1  
The former SELECT is just the outer query, and subquery is the nested query. I agree, that page is missing some key definitions, but to be honest, I had to navigate here to get the 'outer query' terminology, haha: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/subqueries.html Cheers! –  abelito Nov 26 '11 at 11:42
1  
Basically, if I wanted to return everything from stores where poop existed and cities_stores.store_type was equal to stores.store_type, I'd use this query: SELECT DISTINCT * FROM STORES WHERE 'poop' IN cities_stores AND WHERE cities_stores.store_type = stores.store_type);, and the query you've listed returns the entire row, store_type, as long as the EXISTS subquery is true, rather than only the rows where the condition is true? –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 26 '11 at 11:43
    
Great reference, though. I'm going to read that page about 10 times over the next week or two. –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 26 '11 at 11:43
    
Well not exactly. The database doesn't know what column in cities_stores you are searching for poop, so you would need to change cities_stores into a subquery in the IN clause by saying 'poop' IN (SELECT .... ) OR specify column = 'poop' instead. Just a headsup you will need to remove that second WHERE, and the ) at the end. –  abelito Nov 26 '11 at 11:55

It's says that if you have following select:

SELECT a1,b1,c1,...,z1 FROM t1 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT a2,b2,c3,...,z2 FROM t2)

The column list a2,b2,c3,...,z2 is ignored as it's value is not necessary to decide if a row exists or not. It's saves memory and computation time.

edit: To make things clearer: EXISTS tests for non emptyness of the query result. Since one doesn't need to know WHAT was returned by the query to know if it returned something or not, the select columns can be ignored.

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I don't think this is correct because in an EXISTS query, something must be used to determine if the condition is satisfied. "Does x exist across y?" If x and y do not come from the SELECT a2,b2,c3,...,z2 FROM t2 portion, then where are x and y specified in the query, SELECT a1,b1,c1,...,z1 FROM t1 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT a2,b2,c3,...,z2 FROM t2)? Perhaps you could show by comparison of two queries that return similar results? I'm not sure. –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 26 '11 at 11:34
1  
EXISTS doesn't ask the "if x existst across y" question. EXISTS asks only if "y is not empty". You don't need to know anything about returned rows. The subquery doesn't have to have anything in common with the outer query. If is has you put it in WHERE condition of the subquery. –  soulcheck Nov 26 '11 at 11:39

When using EXISTS you only check for the existence of a row, independent of the values. The SELECT part is important if you use IN.

So the selected columns for EXISTS can be ignored, whereas for an IN subquery it is important.

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I don't understand how from what you are saying (e.g., how it is important). –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 26 '11 at 11:29
    
When using WHERE column1 IN (SELECT columns2 ...) the selected column (column2 in the example) is important/needed. If you compare this to WHERE EXISTS (...) you see that no column is required before EXISTS. That's what i ment when saying important. –  H-Man2 Nov 26 '11 at 12:07

I think you are confusing un-correlated subqueries (what your code is), where the subquery can be evaluated independendly of the "outer" query. "Indepentently evaluable subqueries"--subquery which can be evaluated without the context of the superquery:

SELECT column1 
FROM t1 
WHERE EXISTS 
      ( SELECT * 
        FROM t2
      )

with correlated subqueries, where the subquery cannot stand on their own. The correlated-subquery code analogous to the above uncorrelated subquery code is:

SELECT column1 
FROM t1 
WHERE EXISTS 
      ( SELECT * 
        FROM t2
        WHERE t2.somecolumn = t1.somecolumn
      )

and can usually be written also as:

SELECT column1 
FROM t1 
WHERE somecolumn IN
      ( SELECT somecolumn
        FROM t2
      )
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ypercube, thank you. Can you please check the revision? I'm trying to understand. Again, thank you. –  Wolfpack'08 Nov 28 '11 at 4:54

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