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I have a signal file with each line beginning with 0 or 1.

If I have 1 followed by 0 in the next line, then I need to process the 0 signal line.

>#Sample File

>0

>0

>1

>0 (process line)

>0

>1

>0 (process line)
my code
 OUTER : while (<F>) {
   if($_=~/1/){
     my $a = <F>
     process_line($a) if ($a=~/0/);
     next OUTER if ($a=~/1/);
   }

The file is huge, so I don't want to slurp.

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2  
What is the problem with your existing code ? –  codaddict Nov 26 '11 at 11:58
    
Is there more data on each line? Could the extra data contain 0's and 1's too? If so, then your regex needs to be anchored to the start of the line. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 26 '11 at 12:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Something like:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
my $prevLine = "";

sub processline {
    my $line = shift;
    $line =~ s@^0 @@;
    print $line;
}

while (<DATA>) {
    if ($_ =~ /^0/ && $prevline =~ /^1/) {
        processline($_);
    }
    $prevLine = $_;
}

__DATA__
0
0
1
0 (process line)
0
1
0 (process line)

Output

(process line)
(process line)
share|improve this answer
    
Corrected the regexp, for/while and var case parts. Thanks for the clarifications. –  RC. Nov 26 '11 at 16:35
    
You are welcome. –  TLP Nov 26 '11 at 16:39

I see the possible error with your code: Two or more consecutive lines starting with 1 will misfire and skip a match.

while (<>) {
   if(/^1/){            # Ignore everything except 1-lines
      while (<>) {      # Start inner loop
         next if /^1/;  # Skipping consecutive 1-lines
         die "Bad line: $_" unless /^0/;  # Anything not 1 or 0 is not allowed
         process_line($_);
         last;          # Exit inner loop, search for next 1-line
      }
   }
}

Usage options:

script.pl filename        (single file)
script.pl filename*       (glob, multiple files)
some_command | script.pl

Changes:

  • Global filehandle changed to diamond operator, works on STDIN or filename arguments to the script. If you want an explicit open, use open my $fh, '<', $filename or die $!
  • Added anchors in the regexes to match beginning of string only, e.g. /^1/
  • Removed unnecessary label OUTER. next and last will affect the innermost loop only (see perldoc -f last).
  • $_ =~ /^1/ changed to /^1/, which is equivalent, and more legible.
  • Nested use of $_ is valid, and will work as expected. If you want, the inner loop can use another variable, e.g. while (my $line = <>), which may be seem less confusing to some. (Not to me, though)

You should use strict and warnings, if you are not already doing so. Why use strict and warnings?

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Another variation:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
sub processme {
    my $line = shift;
    print $line;
}
while (<>) {
    if (/^1/../^0/) {
        processme( $_ ) if /^0/;
    }
}
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