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I'm creating my own API for a game-statistics system (in PHP). And I want users to be able to log-in to the system from their game.

Basically, the game is made with GM:HTML5 (GameMaker for HTML5) which means it's only obfuscated, but still readable with any JavaScript debugger.

For it to work, users will have to include a PHP library which will connect to my API system. But, I want to limit access by using API Keys.

If I would send the API key with the request, it will be visible (eg. by using Firefox's Developer Console). And with that API key, anyone could "log-in" and submit statistics data.

What I'd like to do, is send the domain where the game is hosted, in encrypted form with the login request. (Just a simple GET request to the server from my PHP library). And then the server would have to decrypt that string (the encrypted domain / IP) and check if it matches the API key which was also send with the request.

But I would like to know, how secure this actually is.

And if insecure, what would be a better way?

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3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Option 2:

Write your own protocol. Make sure to consider all of these factors:

  • Data must not be editable on a proxy level (sign all fields)
  • The request must not be replayable (add a random nonce that must be unique)
  • The request must be executed immediately (add a time parameter)

You want an API system, so include an API key.

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Any code examples... ? :D (for the remote PHP) –  Jeffrey Nov 26 '11 at 14:58
    
$signData = array('oauth_time' => time(), 'oauth_nonce' => uniqid(), 'oauth_consumer_token' => 'abcdef'); - then sign all of these fields with a HMAC (use the oauth_consumer_secret). What I'm trying to say: you may not want the entire OAuth implementation, but the signing concepts in there are very useful. –  Tom van der Woerdt Nov 26 '11 at 15:01
    
I don't want to use OAuth at all :( –  Jeffrey Nov 26 '11 at 15:07
    
I know that. However, any system that implements the 4 requirements I listed in this answer will look a LOT like OAuth. You asked for a code example, and I pointed you at OAuth. Why do you hate OAuth so much? It's the only really solid solution you're going to find, and if you write something yourself it'll end up looking a lot like OAuth. –  Tom van der Woerdt Nov 26 '11 at 15:09
    
Yes, but if I write something myself, I'll have a full understanding of how it works... –  Jeffrey Nov 26 '11 at 15:13
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You could consider using OAuth 1.0 (or 2.0 if you have SSL connections). It's a protocol that has proven itself for sites such as Twitter and Facebook, yet is rather simple to implement.

http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5849

However, do note that in the end no security lib is safe. iOS5's OAuth library was cracked a day after the first developer preview was released. The base rule: if the user has access to the binary version, it's not safe.

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I have already considered OAuth, but I'd like to have my own "system" for this... –  Jeffrey Nov 26 '11 at 14:36
    
Why reinvent the wheel? –  Tom van der Woerdt Nov 26 '11 at 14:45
    
OAuth is way more complicated than required! I just want to have control of the way it works, instead of having to rely on an existing system / protocol. –  Jeffrey Nov 26 '11 at 14:48
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This is an implicit violation of CWE-602, and there will never be a solution to this problem. An attacker will always be able to use tools like TamperData to intercept and modify requests or otherwise modify the code with other means. Perhaps you are looking for "(In)security though obscurity".

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What a useless answer. –  Jeffrey Nov 26 '11 at 17:26
    
@Artaex Media No its the correct answer, you trying to do something that is fundamentally impossible, the sad part is that you think its possible. –  Rook Nov 26 '11 at 17:47
    
I'm looking for a better way (if there's any) and I'm not asking if it's impossible. –  Jeffrey Nov 26 '11 at 18:17
    
@Artaex Media You cannot dictate the behavior of the client, a remote API will always be accessible to the attacker. Thinking otherwise leads to massive security train wreaks, like sending raw sql queries over the net, as if sql injection wasn't a concern. –  Rook Nov 26 '11 at 18:26
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