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I'm not getting any error but the code doesn't do what I want so there must be somewhere in the code where I have made a mistake. What I want to do is if the words match then the words must be a pair and the two chosen cells should remain "self.hidden = False" and therefore the cells should still show the words behind the two cells. Else if the words doesn't match then the cells should be "self.hidden = True" and the two cells should show "---".

Here are the important parts:

from tkinter import *
import random

class Cell:
    def __init__(self, word, hidden):
        self.word = word
        self.hidden = hidden

    def show_word(self):
        """ Shows the word behind the cell """
        if self.hidden == True:
            self.hidden = False
        else:
            self.hidden = True

        self.button["text"] = str(self)

        if mem.choice1 == None:
            mem.choice1 = [self.word, self.hidden]
        else:
            mem.choice2 = [self.word, self.hidden]
            self.check(mem.choice1, mem.choice2)

    def check(self, choice1, choice2):
        """ Checks if the chosen words are a pair """
        tries = 0
        if choice1 == choice2:
            pass
        else:
            self.show_word

        tries += 1

    def __str__(self):
        """ Displays or hides the word """
        if self.hidden == True:
            return "---"
        else:
            return self.word

class Memory(Frame):
    """ GUI application that creates a Memory game """
    def __init__(self, master):
        super(Memory, self).__init__(master)
        self.grid()
        self.create_widgets()
        self.tries = 0
        self.choice1 = None
        self.choice2 = None

    def readShuffle(self):
        """ Creates and organizes (shuffles) the pairs in a list """
        # reads the file and creates a list of the words
        words_file = open("memo.txt","r")
        row = words_file.readline()
        words = list()
        while row != "":
            row = row.rstrip('\n')
            words.append(row)
            row = words_file.readline()
        words_file.close()

        # shuffles the words in the list
        random.shuffle(words)

        # creates 18 pairs of words in a new list
        the_pairs = list()
        for i in range(18):
            the_pairs.append(Cell(words[i],True))
            the_pairs.append(Cell(words[i],True))

        # shuffles the words in the new list
        random.shuffle(the_pairs)

        return the_pairs

    def create_widgets(self):
        """ Create widgets to display the Memory game """
        # instruction text
        Label(self,
              text = "- The Memory Game -",
              font = ("Helvetica", 12, "bold"),
              ).grid(row = 0, column = 0, columnspan = 7)

        # buttons to show the words
        column = 0
        row = 1
        the_pairs = self.readShuffle()
        for index in range(36):
            temp = Button(self,
                   text = the_pairs[index],
                   width = "7",
                   height = "2",
                   relief = GROOVE,
                   command = lambda x = index: Cell.show_word(the_pairs[x])
                   )
            temp.grid(row = row, column = column, padx = 1, pady = 1)
            column += 1
            the_pairs[index].button = temp
            if column == 6:
                column = 0
                row += 1

        # total tries
        self.label = Label(self)
        Label(self,
              text = "Total tries: 0",
              font = ("Helvetica", 11, "italic")
              ).grid(row = 7, columnspan = 7, pady = 5)

        # a quit button
        Button(self,
               text = "Quit",
               font = ("Helvetica", 10, "bold"),
               width = "25",
               height = "1",
               command = self.quit
               ).grid(row = 8, column = 0, columnspan = 7, pady = 5)

##    def update_tries(self):
##        """ Increase tries count and display new total. """
##        self.tries += 1
##        self.label["text"] = "Total Tries: " + str(self.tries)

    def quit(self):
        """ Ends the memory game """
        global root
        root.destroy()

# main
root = Tk()
root.title("Memory")
root.geometry("365x355")
mem = Memory(root)
root.mainloop()
share|improve this question
    
I'm new to python so I don't know exactly what u mean by "initialize". Haven't I done it here? def __init__(self, word, hidden): self.word = word self.hidden = hidden –  Amazon Nov 26 '11 at 15:58
    
If you're going to ask people to debug your code for you, then at least make it a stand-alone example. The "important bits" leave out a lot of other important bits. You're doing a lot of things that don't make sense (e.g. tries in Cell.check will always be 0.) You also have lots of redundant if/else statements. (e.g. your first if/else in Cell.show_word is equivalent to self.hidden = not self.hidden and the entire Cell.check function makes no sense at all.) –  Joe Kington Nov 26 '11 at 16:01
    
Of course I make a lot of mistakes because I'm new to python. I hope ppl can help me out if I had thought wrong somewhere in the code. –  Amazon Nov 26 '11 at 16:12
    
It's okay to ask for help, but it's very hard to follow your train of thought when your code refers to lots of things that aren't defined in the code snippet you posted. It's just inherently harder to debug a snippet that doesn't have enough information to be run. –  Joe Kington Nov 26 '11 at 16:17
    
I have edited my post now so u can run the code. The thing is that ppl have told me before that I shouldn't post the whole code of the program and only the important parts should be posted. –  Amazon Nov 26 '11 at 16:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The immediate problem is that you're not calling self.show_word on line 136 in Cell.check.

def check(self, choice1, choice2):
    """ Checks if the chosen words are a pair """
    tries = 0
    if choice1 == choice2:
        pass
    else:
        self.show_word

    tries += 1

(You should also just use != here, instead of having a pass statement in your if clause. Additionally, tries isn't doing anything here...)

However, even if you do call it (i.e. self.show_word() instead of self.show_word), you have bigger problems, as you'll set up an infinite loop if the words are not the same once you do.

check will call show_word which will then call check, etc, etc.

What you need to do is reset choice1 and choice2 and their respective buttons inside your else statement in Cell.check.

However, to do this, you need to have access to the cell objects in question. As it is, you only pass in their text values and whether or not they're hidden.

The quick fix is to pass around the cell objects themselves.

First, though, let's clean your functions up a bit... You have this:

def show_word(self):
    """ Shows the word behind the cell """
    if self.hidden == True:
        self.hidden = False
    else:
        self.hidden = True

    self.button["text"] = str(self)

    if mem.choice1 == None:
        mem.choice1 = [self.word, self.hidden]
    else:
        mem.choice2 = [self.word, self.hidden]
        self.check(mem.choice1, mem.choice2)

def check(self, choice1, choice2):
    """ Checks if the chosen words are a pair """
    tries = 0
    if choice1 == choice2:
        pass
    else:
        self.show_word

    tries += 1

This is equivalent to:

def show_word(self):
    """ Shows the word behind the cell """
    self.hidden = not self.hidden
    self.button["text"] = str(self)

    if mem.choice1 is None:
        mem.choice1 = [self.word, self.hidden]
    else:
        mem.choice2 = [self.word, self.hidden]
        self.check(mem.choice1, mem.choice2)

def check(self, choice1, choice2):
    """ Checks if the chosen words are a pair """
    if choice1 != choice2:
        self.show_word() # Infinite recursion!!

Now, let's pass around the Cell instances themselves, so that we can reset their displayed values.

def show_word(self):
    """ Shows the word behind the cell """
    self.hidden = not self.hidden
    self.button["text"] = str(self)

    if mem.choice1 is None:
        mem.choice1 = self
    else:
        mem.choice2 = self
        self.check(mem.choice1, mem.choice2)

def check(self, choice1, choice2):
    """ Checks if the chosen words are a pair """
    mem.choice1, mem.choice2 = None, None
    if choice1.word != choice2.word:
        for cell in (choice1, choice2):
            cell.hidden = True
            cell.button['text'] = str(cell)

Now, things will work as you intended. However, the second choice will never be displayed if it doesn't match the first one. (In fact, we could remove the mem.choice2 attribute entirely in this version.)

So, instead, let's only reset the two values on the third click, if they don't match.

def show_word(self):
    """ Shows the word behind the cell """
    self.hidden = not self.hidden
    self.button["text"] = str(self)

    if mem.choice1 is None:
        mem.choice1 = self
    elif mem.choice2 is None:
        mem.choice2 = self
    else:
        choice1, choice2 = mem.choice1, mem.choice2
        mem.choice1, mem.choice2 = self, None
        self.check(choice1, choice2)

def check(self, choice1, choice2):
    """ Checks if the chosen words are a pair """
    if choice1.word != choice2.word:
        for cell in (choice1, choice2):
            cell.hidden = True
            cell.button['text'] = str(cell)

Now, things will behave more or less how you want.

from tkinter import *
import random

class Cell:
    def __init__(self, word, hidden=True):
        self.word = word
        self.hidden = hidden

    def show_word(self):
        """ Shows the word behind the cell """
        self.hidden = not self.hidden
        self.button["text"] = str(self)

        if mem.choice1 is None:
            mem.choice1 = self
        elif mem.choice2 is None:
            mem.choice2 = self
        else:
            choice1, choice2 = mem.choice1, mem.choice2
            mem.choice1, mem.choice2 = self, None
            self.check(choice1, choice2)

    def check(self, choice1, choice2):
        """ Checks if the chosen words are a pair """
        if choice1.word != choice2.word:
            for cell in (choice1, choice2):
                cell.hidden = True
                cell.button['text'] = str(cell)

    def __str__(self):
        """ Displays or hides the word """
        if self.hidden == True:
            return "---"
        else:
            return self.word

class Memory(Frame):
    """ GUI application that creates a Memory game """
    def __init__(self, master):
        super(Memory, self).__init__(master)
        self.grid()
        self.create_widgets()
        self.tries = 0
        self.choice1 = None
        self.choice2 = None

    def readShuffle(self):
        """ Creates and organizes (shuffles) the pairs in a list """
        # reads a list of words from the file
        with open('memo.txt', 'r') as infile:
            words = [line.strip() for line in infile]

        # creates 18 pairs of words in a new list
        the_pairs = list()
        for i in range(18):
            the_pairs.extend([Cell(words[i]), Cell(words[i])])

        # shuffles the words in the new list
        random.shuffle(the_pairs)

        return the_pairs

    def create_widgets(self):
        """ Create widgets to display the Memory game """
        # instruction text
        Label(self,
              text = "- The Memory Game -",
              font = ("Helvetica", 12, "bold"),
              ).grid(row = 0, column = 0, columnspan = 7)

        # buttons to show the words
        column = 0
        row = 1
        the_pairs = self.readShuffle()
        for index in range(36):
            temp = Button(self,
                   text = the_pairs[index],
                   width = "7",
                   height = "2",
                   relief = GROOVE,
                   command = the_pairs[index].show_word
                   )
            temp.grid(row = row, column = column, padx = 1, pady = 1)
            column += 1
            the_pairs[index].button = temp
            if column == 6:
                column = 0
                row += 1

        # total tries
        self.label = Label(self)
        Label(self,
              text = "Total tries: 0",
              font = ("Helvetica", 11, "italic")
              ).grid(row = 7, columnspan = 7, pady = 5)

        # a quit button
        Button(self,
               text = "Quit",
               font = ("Helvetica", 10, "bold"),
               width = "25",
               height = "1",
               command = self.quit
               ).grid(row = 8, column = 0, columnspan = 7, pady = 5)


    def quit(self):
        """ Ends the memory game """
        global root
        root.destroy()

# main
root = Tk()
root.title("Memory")
root.geometry("365x355")
mem = Memory(root)
root.mainloop()

However, there's still a lot of cleanup and re-factoring that you could do. It would make much more sense to have the Memory class handle checking clicks, etc. Also, have a look at the new readShuffle function. You were reading in the file in an amazingly convoluted way. You should probably read over a few basic examples of file usage in python. It's much simpler than you think.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your time. Everything makes much more sense now :) –  Amazon Nov 27 '11 at 19:20
    
There is a bug. When u press an already chosen cell the cell goes hidden and I want it to stay not hidden. I suspect that the row self.hidden = not self.hidden have something to do with it. I have tried different ways to change self.hidden = not self.hidden but I can't seem to get it to work properly. –  Amazon Nov 30 '11 at 1:08
    
It's not a bug. It's the deliberate design of the current code. That is exactly what you originally had it doing. If you want it to stay visible, you'll need to set some sort of flag (e.g. cell.frozen = True) and then check that flag when you change cell.hidden. E.g. self.hidden = not self.hidden if not cell.frozen else True (though it becomes more readable to use a multi-line if statement at that point.) –  Joe Kington Nov 30 '11 at 1:15
    
I'm new to python so I didn't understand you 100%. I tried to change self.hidden = not self.hidden to if self.hidden: self.hidden = False else: self.hidden = False. But that only worked sometimes and cells acted very strange. –  Amazon Dec 1 '11 at 0:57

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