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I have a problem using strtok in C. I get a user input from the command line using fgets and I want to tokenize it with pipe ("|") as the delimeter and put the result in a double pointer variable. Here's my code:

char** argv;
char *token;
token = strtok(userInput, "|");
while(token != NULL){
  *(argv++) = token;
   token = strtok(NULL, "|");
}

*argv = '\0';

I then use this code to verify if it's well tokenized

while(*argv!= NULL)
{
   if((strcmp(*argv, "|") == 0){
   count = count + 1;
   }
   argv++;
}
printf("%d pipes", count);

But it doesn't work. char** argv contains nothing. The execution of the code stops and it returns -1. When I try to print argv, argv contains no values.

Any ideas please? Thanks.

Edit:

What i want to do is this

userInput = "abc|cde";

After using strtok. I want to have an **argv

**argv = "abc";
share|improve this question
    
But it doesn't work. What exactly happens? – Dennis Nov 26 '11 at 15:45
    
When you say it doesn't work, what error are you getting? – Jonathan M Nov 26 '11 at 15:45
    
What do you mean by "doesn't work"? The code does exactly what you tell it to. That may be different from what you expect, but it's impossible to guess if you aren't willing to tell us. – Kerrek SB Nov 26 '11 at 15:45
    
Sorry if I wasn't clear. I meant that char** argv contains nothing. The execution of the code stops and it returns -1. When I try to print argv, argv contains no values. – mkab Nov 26 '11 at 15:51
    
I've edited my question – mkab Nov 26 '11 at 16:11

One problem is that you don't seem to be initializing argv. You need to allocate enough memory for it to hold as many char *s as are needed. Otherwise you're writing to some random block of memory. (Is it just that you haven't shown us the relevant code?)

Another problem is that you're actually modifying argv, so at the end of that loop, it's pointing one past the last token (and then you set *argv to NULL); but your verification code assumes that it's pointing to the first token, and starts by confirming that *argv is not NULL. (Is it just that you haven't shown us some relevant code?) Edited to add: I see from your comment above that "argv contains no values". I'm pretty confident that this is the reason why.

Incidentally, you're confusing '\0' (a null byte) with NULL (a null pointer). Technically this works out correctly — '\0' gets promoted to 0, 0 gets converted to NULL — but I find it a bit worrisome that you're confusing them, since conceptually they are quite different. You should write *argv = NULL rather than *argv = '\0', for clarity if nothing else.

share|improve this answer
    
Please check my edited question – mkab Nov 26 '11 at 16:11

your tokenizing code works like this : if

userInput = "a|b|c"

then

argv = { "a", "b", "c" }

you might be expecting that

argv = {"a","|","b","|","c"}

Your code to count pipes should be :

while(*argv != NULL)
{
   count = count + 1;
   argv++;
}
printf("%d pipes", count-1);

I think it will work

share|improve this answer
    
It's a little close to what i want. Actually what I want is: if I have a userInput like {a b | c d NULL}, I want a char **argv = {"a", "b", NULL} – mkab Nov 26 '11 at 16:01
    
Please check my edited question – mkab Nov 26 '11 at 16:11
    
Are you saying that you just want the substring before first '|' delimiter. ?? – anshul410 Nov 26 '11 at 16:46
    
Yes exaclty! I want to use the string before and after the first delimiter. So for example before the pipe I can have ls -l So I want to put this ls -l in an **argv and execute it using execvp. – mkab Nov 26 '11 at 16:50

what I am using is this format for searching 300x400. looking for the "x" to get rid of the x and use both sides, the 300 and 400 . this works for me.

 char *tok1, *tok2, *saveptr;

 tok1 = strtok_r(argv, "x", &saveptr);
 tok2 = strtok_r(NULL, "x", &saveptr);

 printf("this tok1 %s this is tok2 %s\n", tok1, tok2);

using strtok_r function

share|improve this answer

the problem is your argv does not point to first element when you try to get result from it.

problem occurs here: *(argv++) = token

argv (a pointer to char*) is increased when you add token pointer to argv array (I assume you have initialized it correctly). So when you use the second part of code to get the result, argv already points to the last element, in your case '\0', which will produce no output.

And, you are mixing '\0' with NULL, although they are both right grammatically, but it using NULL is better in your case, because it means a pointer, but '\0' means null-terminate in a C-string

You can change the your code to the following:

/* Init argv array */
char** argv;
size_t argc=0;  // token count
char *token;
token = strtok(userInput, "|");
while(token != NULL){
   argv[argc++] = token;
   token = strtok(NULL, "|");
}
argv[argc] = NULL;  // the last element of argv array is a NULL pointer

/* get result from argv */

while(*argv!= NULL)
{
   if((strcmp(*argv, "|") == 0){
   count = count + 1;
   }
   argv++;
}
printf("%d pipes", count);
share|improve this answer

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