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I took the code of DCL from Joe Duffy's book 'Concurrent programming on windows'

class LazyInit<T> where T : class
{
private volatile T m_value;
private object m_sync = new object();
private Func<T> m_factory;
public  LazyInit(Func<T>  factory)  {  m_factory  =  factory;  }
public T value
{
  get
  {
    if (m_value == null)
    {
      lock (m_sync)
      {
        if (m_value == null)
        {
          m_value = m_factory();
        }
      }
    }
    return m_value;
  }
}
}

it is said marking m_value volatile can prevent writes reordering that will leads to other threads getting 'non null object with uninitialized fields'. If the problem happens just because the possible writes reordering, can I just use 'Volatile Write' instead of marking the filed volatile, like below? (This code looks a little awkward for demonstration, I just want to make sure if we can only use volatile write instead)

class LazyInit<T> where T : class
{
private object m_value;
private object m_sync = new object();
private Func<T> m_factory;
public  LazyInit(Func<T>  factory)  {  m_factory  =  factory;  }
public T value
{
  get
  {
    if (m_value == null)
    {
      lock (m_sync)
      {
        if (m_value == null)
        {
          Thread.VolatileWrite(ref m_value, m_factory());
        }
      }
    }
    return (T)m_value;
  }
}
}

A related question is the Interlocked version from the book

class LazylnitRelaxedRef<T> where T : class
{
private volatile T m_value;
private Func<T> m_factory;
public LazylnitRelaxedRef(Func<T> factory) { m_factory = factory; }
public T Value
{
  get
  {
    if (m_value == null)
      Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref  m_value, m_factory(), null);
    return m_value;
  }
}
}

Since the ECMA-CLI specs the 'Interlocked operation perform implicit acquire/release operations', do we still need volatile in this case?

share|improve this question
2  
There is an important difference between the ECMA memory model, and the .net 2 memory model. –  CodesInChaos Nov 26 '11 at 15:58
    
Why do you need to perform double check locking? Have you observed a performance issue with your application with acquiring a lock? –  Allon Guralnek Nov 26 '11 at 21:57
1  
@CodeInChaos, please elaborate on what the "important difference" is. –  Amy Nov 26 '11 at 22:16
    
@CodeInChaos,@AllonGuralnek, I know the .NET 2 has a strong MM. Because many materials talks about the write reorder problem when constructing the singleton object, since the volatile write can prevent this problem, I wonder if, just using volatile write without volatile read, will there be some problems in weaker memory models (like ECMA)? –  Fei Nov 27 '11 at 13:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, messing with volatile is really hard, so don't get too loose with it! But, here is a really close answer to your question, and here is an article that I think everyone should read before using the keyword volatile, and definitely before starting to use VolatileRead, VolatileWrite and MemoryBarrier.

The answer in the first link is: no you don't need to use volatile, you just need to use System.Threading.Thread.MemoryBarrier() RIGHT BEFORE you assign the new value. This is because the release_fence implied when using the volatile keyword makes sure that it gets finished writing out to the main memory, and that no read/write operations can be performed until it's finished.

So, what does Thread.VolatileWrite() do, and does it perform the same functions that we get from the 'volatile' keyword? Well, here's the full code from this function:

public static void VolatileWrite (ref int address, int value)
{
  MemoryBarrier(); address = value;
}

Yes, it calls MemoryBarrier right before it assigns your value, which is sufficient!

share|improve this answer
    
,Sorry for having misleaded you by the code, I was supposed to ask, for the DCL, is there any problem in some weaker memory models if the read is not volatile or doesn't apply acquire fence on read? BTW, the .net uses the full fence for the implementation of the API Thread.VolatileRead and Thread.VolatileWrite, which means they are stronger than a volatile read and a volatile write. For my question, let's consider the volatile read case, not the API one.(Again, sorry for misleading you by the code) –  Fei Nov 27 '11 at 14:59
1  
The original volatile behavior is to put a barrier before the write and after the read. I'd suggest a memory barrier before and after the write operations and before a read operation. If we have write and then read immediately after it, we risk that these 2 operations be swapped because of no barrier between them. –  Ivaylo Slavov Dec 5 '11 at 15:23
    
@Ivaylo Slavov, for 'swapped', could you pls give me more information about what would happen in this case to break the DCL? BTW, will this 'swapping' break the data dependency? –  Fei Dec 8 '11 at 7:49
    
@Fei, By 'swapping' I mean the order in which the read and write operations will be executed by the processor(s). If you have read and after it a write operation to a standard volatile field, chances are that the write operation might be executed before the read, because there is no barrier between them. When Thread.MemoryBarrier is used, it ensures that an operation before the barrier will never get swapped with an operation after the barrier. The swapping us usually dependent on the processor architecture and the system the code runs on, but digging into this matter will complicate the topic –  Ivaylo Slavov Dec 8 '11 at 8:48

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