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I've run into some trouble with loading a sub-classed UIViewController from a nib. My viewDidLoad function is never called.

The super-class has no nib, but the sub-classes each have their own. i.e.

@interface SuperClass : UIViewController {
}
@end


@interface SubClass : SuperClass{
}
@end
@implementation SubClass
- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil
{
self = [super initWithNibName:nibNameOrNil bundle:nibBundleOrNil];
if (self) {
}
return self;
}
- (void)viewDidLoad{
// Never called
}

The view is loaded from a nib as follows:

SubClass *scvc = [[SubClass alloc]     initWithNibName:@"SubClass" bundle:nil];
    [self.navigationController pushViewController:scvc animated:YES];
    [scvc release];

There is a nib file with this name and it has it's file owner's class set properly.

viewDidLoad is not called in the child or super. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure the nib is loaded correctly, can you see it on the scene? You could add NSLog(@"Methods %@ called", NSStringFromSelector(_cmd)); to check which methods are called. –  Tieme Nov 26 '11 at 17:12
    
Nope, the nib is not loaded correctly. The views that are created from code in the Super class are loaded, but the views from the nib file never get loaded (all the IBOUtlets are nil). Where would you log the called methods? –  Steve Nov 26 '11 at 17:21

4 Answers 4

You say you are creating views in code (using loadView) in the super class, but trying to use a nib in the sub class?

According to the UIViewController docs (emphasis mine)

If you specify views using a nib file, you must not override loadView but should instead create a nib file in Interface Builder...

It looks like you may have a conflict there. As a test, comment out the loadView method in your superclass and see where that gets you.

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I'm assuming SuperClass implements loadView. So when your SubClass is asked to loadView, you get your SuperClass' implementation, which overrides the normal nib loading mechanism.

I would rethink your design here. Your SuperClass' behavior is quite different from what you want your SubClass to do. Maybe that's not the best relationship there.

But, if you want, you should be able to at least make it work by doing this in your SubClass.m:

-(void)loadView {

    IMP defaultImp = class_getMethodImplementation([[self superclass] superclass], _cmd);

    /* or alternatively...
    IMP defaultImp = class_getMethodImplementation([UIViewController class], _cmd);
    */

    defaultImp(self, _cmd);
}

This implements a loadView for your subclass that skips over the loadView of your SuperClass and calls the default implementation instead.

IMO, this is ugly and might need to revisited if your class hierarchy expanded. I wouldn't do this in my own app, I would rethink the class hierarchy instead.

share|improve this answer

Where is this block located

SubClass *scvc = [[SubClass alloc]     initWithNibName:@"SubClass" bundle:nil];
    [self.navigationController pushViewController:scvc animated:YES];
    [scvc release];

Are you sure it is called ?

I made a testproject to test it and the following works:

In your appDelegate.m file i put the following in the application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions method

UINavigationController *navController = [[UINavigationController alloc] init];
self.window.rootViewController = navController;

SubClass *viewController1 = [[[SubClass alloc] initWithNibName:@"SubClass" bundle:nil] autorelease];

[navController pushViewController:viewController1 animated:YES];

SuperClass.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@interface SuperClass : UIViewController
@end

SuperClass.m

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
#import "SuperClass.h"

@implementation SuperClass
@end

SubClass.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
#import "SuperClass.h"

@interface SubClass : SuperClass
@end

SubClass.m

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
#import "SubClass.h"

@implementation SubClass

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil
{
    self = [super initWithNibName:nibNameOrNil bundle:nibBundleOrNil];
    if (self) {
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    NSLog(@"Methods %@ called", NSStringFromSelector(_cmd));
    [super viewDidLoad];
        // Do any additional setup after loading the view, typically from a nib.
}
@end

This works for me, make sure you set the right class for your nibFile aswell. Click on the file's owner icon and change the class from UIViewController to SubClass

share|improve this answer
    
That block was located in another view controler that pushes this view. It was being called. I found the solution - my simplification in the problem above actually left out the problem code. In the real application there are two super classes that are called. In one of them, I was initializing the main view in code in a setup function, thus I think it was overriding the call to the nib and the other views were never loaded. Thanks! –  Steve Nov 26 '11 at 17:49

Try to add:

[super viewDidLoad];
share|improve this answer
    
Yes the super's viewDidLoad is being called. Just removed it for clarity in the post here. Regardless the method isn't called at al anyways. –  Steve Nov 26 '11 at 17:19

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