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Basically, what I want to do is this:

From one function void A() I call another function void B(). B in turn calls on the function void C(). How can I, after some statement, return to the last called line in A from C? If I type return I return to B, but I don't want this code in B to be executed if the statement in C is true, I want to end up in A. I could change C to bool C() and check this in B, but I'd rather not.

So, is there some type of double return I could use? The exit-keyword exits the entire program which is not what I want to do.

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1  
Almost certainly you are trying to do something that can be done better with a bit more careful thought. Why not describe the actual problem you're trying to solve? –  Kerrek SB Nov 26 '11 at 18:31
    
Ok. I'm making a small text based game. So the function A is basically what I call action(), where the character in turn makes his move. From action() I can call to fight(), if I want to fight another character. fight() is turn based, so for each characters turn in the fight you call to hit(). In hit() I want to add a input choice to run instead of fight. When I run I want to exit fight(), but not action(). –  pigelin Nov 26 '11 at 18:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

what is wrong with this one?

void A() {
  B();
}

void B() {
  if (!C()) return;
  ...
}

bool C() {
  ..
}
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I ended up with this one. Thanks. –  pigelin Nov 26 '11 at 19:00

It is not directly possible to return to anything but a function's immediate caller (B, in this case) unless you use longjmp, which I believe is not advisable in C++. However, if the reason you want to skip B is that an error has occurred in C and the error can only be handled by A, you can use exceptions (warning: incomplete example; my C++ is getting rusty):

#include <stdexcept>

void A() {
    try {
        B();
    }
    catch (std::exception& e) {
        // You'll get here if C throws
    }
}

void B() {
    C();
}

void C() {
    if (someCondition)
        return; // Sends you to B
    else
        throw std::exception; // Sends you to A since B does not contain a try/catch
}

But please do not use exceptions for regular (non-exceptional) control flow; use it only for actual error situations.

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you could do something like this, but I don't recommend it cause there all kinds of issues with this:

jmp_buf env;

A()
{
  jmp_buf env;
  if ( !setjmp( &env ) )
  {
    B();
  }
  ...
}

B()
{
  C();
}

C()
{
  if ( for_some_reason )
  {
    longjmp( &env, 1 );
  }
}
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You've given C the wrong signature. It should be bool C and return a "success" indicator to B which then returns immediately to A or continues as appropriate.

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This is what I was thinking too. Just wanted to avoid it because I then have to change a lot of code. –  pigelin Nov 26 '11 at 18:52

Of course you can, with a simple assembly trick:

leave
leave
ret

Basically this code goes through B's stack frame to obtain the return address in A, then resumes execution from there. Sample program (it's C, but you don't mind, do you? ;) ):

void C()
{
    printf("Inside C...\n");
    __asm__("leave");
    __asm__("leave");
    __asm__("ret");
}

void B()
{
    printf("Calling C...\n");
    C();
    printf("Returned from C...\n");
}

int main()
{
    B();
}

Here's the output:

blackbear@blackbear-laptop:~$ ./a.out 
Calling C...
Inside C...
blackbear@blackbear-laptop:~$ 
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1  
who needs ARM anyway :V –  pezcode Nov 26 '11 at 18:40
    
@pezcode: this is x86 –  BlackBear Nov 26 '11 at 18:45
    
@BlackBear: That's his point. –  dmckee Nov 26 '11 at 18:53
    
@pezcode: ah, I've misunderstood your comment. Well, I don't think what the OP's asking is standard C, so it will surely depend on something. This is a solution, the best I can think of :) –  BlackBear Nov 26 '11 at 18:59

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