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When I execute the following code, I get output a list of lines from the file, with line numbers.

<?php
$lines = file('C:\sm\lines.txt');
foreach ($lines as $line_num => $line) {
    echo "Line #<b>{$line_num}</b> : " . htmlspecialchars($line) . "<br />\n";
}
?>

Now I would imagine the array returned by file() would be a simple one dimensional vector, and I would have to keep a line_num variable in my loop. How do things work here that I get the associative pair $line_num => $line for each line in the file?

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Basically do you want to know why you get a numerical array and you can use the foreach? –  Aurelio De Rosa Nov 26 '11 at 18:36
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

file is effectively the same as iterating a filepointer and adding each line in the file to an array. You dont get the line numbers, but the regular numeric index in the array.

In other words, file does

function file($filename) 
{
    $fp = fopen($filename);
    while (!eof($fp)) {
        $lines[] = fgets($fp);
    }
    fclose($fp);
    return $lines;
}

This is of course simplified. If you want to know the exact details, have a look at

As for why you can do

foreach ($lines as $line_num => $line) {

see http://php.net/manual/en/control-structures.foreach.php

foreach (array_expression as $value) statement
foreach (array_expression as $key => $value) statement

The first form loops over the array given by array_expression. On each iteration, the value of the current element is assigned to $value and the internal array pointer is advanced by one (so on the next iteration, you'll be looking at the next element).

The second form will additionally assign the current element's key to the $key variable on each iteration.

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It is not the line number, it is the index of the entry within the array. In this case its always $lineNumber = $index + 1, because file() creates a new index entry for every line

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A non-associative array automatically gets assigned numeric array keys, i.e.

array(
  0 => 'first item',
  1 => 'second item,
  ...
  9 => 'tenth item',
);

So the array key winds up being the line number minus one.

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Now I would imagine the array returned by file() would be a simple one dimensional vector, and I would have to keep a line_num variable in my loop

A PHP array is actually an ordered map:

http://uk.php.net/manual/en/language.types.array.php

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