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This question may seem like a novice, and perhaps 'stupid' question but please bear with me...

I'm still struggling to find a way to get my Java application to use a keystore located inside the JAR file, and I'm very tempted just to disable certificate validation all together using the method here. However, before I do so, I just wanted to confirm why you should not do this and whether those reasons actually apply to me.

I've heard that no certificate validation can make your application liable to "Man In The Middle" attacks (I think), but even if I am correct, I am unsure as to what these actually are so please could somebody explain. Though, if they are what I think they could be, I'm not sure whether my application ever be subject to them because, my application only uses an SSL connection to obtain data from my website, so users do not tell the application which URLs to visit - if that makes sense...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's, an attack scenario. Other's might want to contribute some more.

Your application accesses a URL. At some point along the way (any intermediate network hop), an attacker could position himself as a "man-in-the-middle", that is, he would pretend to be a "proxy" for your communication, being able to read everything that goes through, and even modifying it on the way: the attacker could act on behalf of the user, mislead him as to what information he gets, and basically access al data being transferred.

Enter SSL: your client receives a certificate from the server, with a valid key (Signed by a known certification authority, or present in your keystore). The server will then sign and encrypt all it sends using that key. If an attacker where to place himself in the middle, he would not be able to read the data (it's encrypted) or modify it (it's signed, and modification would break the signature). He could still block communications altogether, but that's another story.

So that's that... if you ignore your keystore, you can't verify any server side certificate, and you open the door to man-in-the-middle attacks.

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Thank you Miguel and user384706, both you answers were helpful and I am now able to conclude that I need the keystore. If I do manage to place the keystore inside of the JAR file though, will it ever need updating? I only ask because I know that SSL Certificates need renewing, but I don't know if renewing them will effect the information in the keystore... –  Andy Nov 26 '11 at 19:40
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@Andy: You will have to update it if the service provider's public key changes, this depends on your key provider's policies. You should be prepared for this... at least discuss it with the provider. –  home Nov 26 '11 at 19:45
    
@home okay, but otherwise I shouldn't need to, yes? –  Andy Nov 26 '11 at 19:47
    
@Andy: it depends, in general public keys have an expiration date. If you open the certificate (public key) you should be able to see that value. –  home Nov 26 '11 at 19:53
    
@home okay, I will have to look into this a little further then. Thanks for everyone's help though! –  Andy Nov 26 '11 at 19:59

Though, if they are what I think they could be, I'm not sure whether my application ever be subject to them because, my application only uses an SSL connection to obtain data from my website, so users do not tell the application which URLs to visit - if that makes sense...

If you connect to a server via SSL and you don't do any authentication, effectively you are have no security.
You have no idea who is the endpoint you are talking to.

The fact that the user does not type in a URL, but the URL is a hardcoded URL to your site is irrelevant. A simple proxy that forwards the data from your client to the server can steal all your client's data since there is no kind of authentication (this is the Man in the Middle Attack).

I would suggest you put the code you are using to load the keystore so that you get help on that.
Otherwise, if you don't have any requirements on security and you don't have any sensitive data you should go for plain connection (i.e. non-SSL) so that your performance does not deteriorate due to the unecessary (in your case) SSL overhead

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With un-authenticated SSL you have security against passive eavesdroppers, but not against any active attacker (who can pretend to be something else). Alas, the principal threat to most secure communications is active attackers (e.g., proxies of various kinds). –  Donal Fellows Nov 26 '11 at 22:35

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