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It looks like having descriptive field names (the ones I like the most) can take much space in the memory for big collections. I don't like the idea of giving them short and cryptic names to save memory, neither do I like the idea to translate field names to shortened fields somewhere in the application.

Is there a way to tell mongo not to store every field name as text?

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Great question. I was forced to aliase my field names with "A", "B" and so forth. – Violet Giraffe Nov 26 '11 at 19:35
up vote 1 down vote accepted

For now the only thing you can do is to vote and wait for SERVER-863 to be solved. After almost a year of discussion the status of this issue has been changes to planned but not scheduled...

The workaround is to use document mapping libraries likes Spring Data Document or morphia (in Java world) and work with nicely named objects. But the underlying database names are still cryptic.

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Damn this is sad. Really, in the real world "documents" have at least similar properties, why would mongo assume different? – Fluffy Nov 26 '11 at 22:59

If you are using an "object-document mapper" library to access MongoDB, many of them provide facilities for using descriptive names within your application code, but storing short names in the database. If your application has a data access layer, it may be possible for you to implement this logic in your application code, as well.

Since you haven't said what language you're using, or whether you're using an ODM at all, I provide any more guidance on which ODMs might fit your needs.

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