Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want my timer to execute the actionPerformed method only one time once it 5 seconds the time but it is writing in the console "Hello" lots of times:

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;

import javax.swing.Timer;

public class X{
    public static void main(String args[]) {

        ActionListener actionListener = new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent actionEvent) {
                System.out.println( "Hello" );
            }
        };
        Timer timer = new Timer( 5000, actionListener );
        timer.start();
    }
}

How can I make the effect I want? Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
What does lots of times mean? The code looks fine at first glance... –  Petar Minchev Nov 26 '11 at 20:53
    
I meant it writes "Hello" forever. –  Rama Nov 26 '11 at 20:55
1  
What behavior do you want? –  trashgod Nov 26 '11 at 21:13
    
To write "Hello" only one time. –  Rama Nov 26 '11 at 21:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As already mentioned, it's better to use java.util.Timer, but you can also use setRepeats() before starting:

timer.setRepeats(false);
share|improve this answer

Sounds like you want a java.util.Timer rather than a javax.swing.Timer.

share|improve this answer
    
When I import javax.util.Timer Java doesn't let me call: java.util.Timer timer = new java.util.Timer( 5000, actionListener ); It says "he constructor Timer(int, ActionListener) is undefined". How can I make the same effect with Java.util? –  Rama Nov 26 '11 at 20:57
1  
@Rama not, never, don't use java.util.Timer for Swing GUI related Event, since javax.swing.Timer isn't accurate (in compare with java.util.Timer), but is best way for Java GUI based on Swing –  mKorbel Nov 26 '11 at 21:23
1  
If using javax.util.Timer, update the GUI using a continuation. –  trashgod Nov 26 '11 at 22:26
    
Yes, as @trashgod says, if you need to update the GUI, make sure the code that does it is running on the Event dispatcher thread. However, in your example you are not running any code that interacts with the GUI. –  fd. Nov 28 '11 at 13:37

Don't neglect to use the event dispatch thread. There's nothing wrong with java.util.Timer, but javax.swing.Timer has several advantages with Swing.

import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;

import javax.swing.Timer;

public class X {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                ActionListener actionListener = new ActionListener() {

                    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent actionEvent) {
                        System.out.println("Hello");
                    }
                };
                Timer timer = new Timer(5000, actionListener);
                timer.start();
            }
        });
    }
}

If using java.util.Timer, update the GUI using a continuation.

share|improve this answer
    
why would you do that in the event dispatch thread? –  unbeli Nov 26 '11 at 21:03
    
Good question, but I think the down-vote is unwarranted. Absent posting a Runnable to the event dispatch thread, the initial thread may exit before the javax.swing.Timer fires, as it does on my platform. –  trashgod Nov 26 '11 at 21:10
    
you are right and correct answer +1 –  mKorbel Nov 26 '11 at 21:25

the swing timer makes sure the thread won't be called during 'bad' times. see http://java.sun.com/products/jfc/tsc/articles/timer/ for a good explanation/example code.

To get the timer to tick once, call the stop() method on the Timer inside the actionPerformed(). You could also call setRepeats(false) before starting the timer as an alternative.

share|improve this answer
class MyTask extends TimerTask {
    public void run() {
      System.out.println("Hello");

    }
  }

and then

timer = new Timer();
timer.schedule(new MyTask(), 5000);
share|improve this answer
    
I like this solution but my class X needs to be Runnable so I implemented run to do other tasks... –  Rama Nov 26 '11 at 21:22

This should do the trick!

new JFrame().setVisible(true);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.