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I Have the following code

class MyClass{ 
  protected $something = $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'];
}

and I get the following error on that line:

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected T_VARIABLE in ....

Can I do this? or what I'm doing wrong.

Best Regards,

PS: Sorry about the title, if you can find a better one, feel free to change it.

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closed as too localized by tereško, cryptic ツ, NikiC, NullPoiиteя, Dejan Marjanovic Feb 24 '13 at 3:47

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you're assigning a value to $something in that context, it needs to be a constant value, like a number or string. The following works,

protected $something = 'foo';

But the following does not:

protected $something = $foo;

So, if you want to assign a value to that variable, you should do it on the constructor:

class MyClass {
  protected $something;

  function __construct() {
    $this->something = $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'];
  }
}
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Thanks alot, I will accept it in 8 minutes, 'cause I can't right now. –  Uffo Nov 26 '11 at 23:07
    
@Uffo: Glad to help :) –  Matchu Nov 27 '11 at 0:01
    
@Uffo: Oh! And as a suggested refactor, consider passing the URI in as an argument to the constructor. Since it just somehow seems strange to me to access a superglobal from inside a class definition. But whatever floats your boat :) –  Matchu Nov 27 '11 at 0:02

Php won't let you do this as a definition of a property.

You can refactor it like this:

class MyClass {
    protected $something;
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->something = $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'];
    }
}
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$something doesn't expect to be filled from another variable. Try this

class MyClass{ 
  protected $something;
  function __construct(){
       $this->something = $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI']
  }
}
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