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I’ve got three functions, foo, bar and baz, which, from my point of view, should produce identical results. However, I’m stuck with a problem that references are shared between recursive function calls.

$array = array(
    'subs' => array(
        'a' => 1,
        'b' => 2,
    ),
);

function foo(&$array, $value, $callAgain = true) {
    $subs =& $array['subs'];
    foreach ($subs as &$sub)
        $sub = $value;
    if ($callAgain) {
        $copy = $array;
        foo($copy, $value + 1, false);
    }
}

function bar(&$array, $value, $callAgain = true) {
    foreach ($array['subs'] as &$sub)
        $sub = $value;
    if ($callAgain) {
        $copy = $array;
        bar($copy, $value + 1, false);
    }
}

function baz(&$array, $value, $callAgain = true) {
    foreach ($array['subs'] as $key => $sub)
        $array['subs'][$key] = $value;
    if ($callAgain) {
        $copy = $array;
        baz($copy, $value + 1, false);
    }
}

foo($array, 3);
var_dump($array);
bar($array, 3);
var_dump($array);
baz($array, 3);
var_dump($array);

This code produces the following results:

array
  'subs' => 
    array
      'a' => int 4
      'b' => int 4
array
  'subs' => 
    array
      'a' => int 3
      'b' => int 4
array
  'subs' => 
    array
      'a' => int 3
      'b' => int 3

However, I expect all of them to return 3, 3, because copies of the array are passed to recursive calls.

How to fix the first two functions to make them return 3, 3? I’d prefer not to use syntax of the baz function, because it’s very verbose.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you have answered your own question-- baz IS the way to get the behavior you want. The other two functions are behaving as intended in PHP, at least according to the manual page on What References Do:

Note, however, that references inside arrays are potentially dangerous. Doing a normal (not by reference) assignment with a reference on the right side does not turn the left side into a reference, but references inside arrays are preserved in these normal assignments. This also applies to function calls where the array is passed by value. Example:

/* Assignment of array variables */
$arr = array(1);
$a =& $arr[0]; //$a and $arr[0] are in the same reference set
$arr2 = $arr; //not an assignment-by-reference!
$arr2[0]++;
/* $a == 2, $arr == array(2) */
/* The contents of $arr are changed even though it's not a reference! */
?>

In other words, the reference behavior of arrays is defined in an element-by-element basis; the reference behavior of individual elements is dissociated from the reference status of the array container.

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If ANY variable ANYWHERE in the code references ANY value inside the array, I can't rely on copying the array (copy will have references where variables point)? So, the way I see it, I can NEVER reference inside arrays, including using foreach($a => &$v), because it “corrupts” the array so that it can’t be copied properly? Now, that's shocking news. –  Athari Nov 27 '11 at 0:34
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