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I've basically the following two classes for which I use return-by-value functions to create objects. In the Bar class below, I've two Foo class member objects. How could I initialize correctly, each of those two objects separately? Below, I'm giving an ilustration about the compiler error that is displayed.

template < typename T >
class Foo{

    public:
        Foo( );
        Foo( const Foo<T> & );
        ~Foo();

        friend Foo<T> createFoo1( double, bool );
        friend Foo<T> createFoo2( double, bool );
        friend Foo<T> createFoo3( int );

    private:

        std::vector<T> m_data;

};

template < typename T >
Foo<T> createFoo1( double param1, bool param2 ){
    Foo<T> myFoo;

    // fill myFoo.
    return (myFoo);
}

template < typename T >
class Bar{

    public:

        Bar( );
        Bar( const Foo<T> &, const Foo<T> & );
        Bar( const Bar<T> & );
        ~Bar( );

        friend Bar<T> createBar1( double, bool );

    private:
        Foo<T> m_fooY;
        Foo<T> m_fooX;
};

template < typename T >
Bar<T> createBar1( double param1, bool param2 ){
    Bar<T> myBar( createFoo1<T>(param1, param2), createFoo1<T>(param1, param2) ); //OK
    return (myBar);

    //Bar<T> myBar;
    //myBar.m_fooY(createFoo1<T>(param1, param2)); // <- error C2064: term does not evaluate to a function taking 1 arguments
    //myBar.m_fooX(createFoo1<T>(param1, param2)); // <- error C2064: term does not evaluate to a function taking 1 arguments
    //return (myBar);
}
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The // OK line is fine, why do you need another solution? –  Kerrek SB Nov 27 '11 at 0:58
    
@KerrekSB, I wanted to understand what was wrong since it was my first try. –  Tin Nov 27 '11 at 1:01
    
Alright, but the // OK line is about the only "right" way of doing it. Don't use the other ones. –  Kerrek SB Nov 27 '11 at 1:02
    
@KerrekSB, the solution given by Adam Z. below is also wrong? if yes, why? –  Tin Nov 27 '11 at 1:03
    
It's not incorrect, but you would never use it like that. Always initialize correctly. The Adam method first default-initializes and then assigns. Best case that's just redundant and hard to read; worst case it simply won't work with non-default-constructible types (this includes base subobjects). –  Kerrek SB Nov 27 '11 at 1:05
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is how you can set the fields m_fooX and m_fooY other than through the constructor:

template < typename T >
Bar<T> createBar1( double param1, bool param2 ){
  Bar<T> myBar;
  myBar.m_fooY = createFoo1<T>(param1, param2);
  myBar.m_fooX = createFoo1<T>(param1, param2);
  return myBar;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks! It worked! –  Tin Nov 27 '11 at 0:59
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