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I am trying to solve my question regarding using push_back in more than one level. From the comments/answers it is clear that I have to:

  1. Create a copy operator which takes a const argument
  2. Modify all my operators to const

But because this header file is given to me there is an operator what I cannot make into const. It is a simple:

float & operator [] (int i) {
    return _item[i];
}

In the given program, this operator is used to get and set data.

My problem is that because I need to have this operator in the header file, I cannot turn all the other operators to const, what means I cannot insert a copy operator.

How can I make all my operators into const, while preserving the functionality of the already written program?

Here is the full declaration of the class:

class Vector3f {

    float _item[3];

    public:

    float & operator [] (int i) {
        return _item[i];
        }

    Vector3f(float x, float y, float z) 
    {  _item[0] = x ; _item[1] = y ; _item[2] = z; };

    Vector3f() {};

    Vector3f & operator = ( const Vector3f& obj) 
    {
        _item[0] = obj[0];
        _item[1] = obj[1];
        _item[2] = obj[2];

        return *this;
    };

    Vector3f & operator += ( const Vector3f & obj) 
    {
        _item[0] += obj[0];
        _item[1] += obj[1];
        _item[2] += obj[2];

        return *this;
    };

    bool operator ==( const Vector3f & obj) {
        bool x = (_item[0] == obj[0]) && (_item[1] == obj[1]) && (_item[2] == obj[2]);
        return x;
    }


    // my copy operator
    Vector3f(const Vector3f& obj) {
        _item[0] += obj[0];
        _item[1] += obj[1];
        _item[2] += obj[2];

        return this;
    }

};
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2  
I think there's a fundamental misunderstanding taking place at the core of this question. –  Mooing Duck Nov 27 '11 at 1:43
    
You do not need to Modify all my operators to const. Half of them would make no sense on a const object anyway. –  Mooing Duck Nov 27 '11 at 1:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I did not really understand what you're trying to do, but I noticed that this code can't possibly compile. The reason is that copy is handled by a copy constructor, not operator. Which means that, like any constructor, it doesn't return anything. Remove the return statement from your constructor, like so:

Vector3f(const Vector3f& obj) {
    _item[0] += obj[0];
    _item[1] += obj[1];
    _item[2] += obj[2];
}

As for making your operator const, you can simply overload it and offer two versions of the same method. The first one will be non-const and will return a reference (allowing modifications), while the second will be const and return a copy (ideally you should return a const reference, but since floats are primitive types, just return by value).

float & operator [] (int i) 
{
    return _item[i];
}
float operator [] (int i) const 
{
    return _item[i];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Problem here is that you don't return the float by reference in the const case -- which changes the semantics of what is going on. –  Soren Nov 27 '11 at 1:50
    
Why would it changes the semantics? –  Etienne de Martel Nov 27 '11 at 1:54
    
@Soren: Not in the posted use cases. Only if you took an explicit const reference- very unusual for float values- would it actually change that. –  Puppy Nov 27 '11 at 1:59
    
I strongly feel that 1) Changing the const-ness of variable should not affect program semantic, only whether it is well-formed and 2) removing const should not make code ill-formed. This design breaks 1). In particular, the precondition of const and non-const [] must be the same. (Was not true with C++97 string.) The invalidation semantic must also be the same (not true for begin/end/[] with C++97 string: the first non-const begin/end/[] call would invalidate const_iterator obtained before). –  curiousguy Nov 27 '11 at 5:38
    
(...) With your design, removing const can change program semantic and silently break code, and so can adding const. x[i] should always be a lvalue, or always be a rvalue. This should not be one or the other depending on const-ness. lvalue-ness changes the semantic of reference binding. –  curiousguy Nov 27 '11 at 5:40

This is quite normal -- you make an operator which provides both at regular value by reference as well as a const value by reference;

float & operator [] (int i) 
{
    return _item[i];
}

const float & operator [] (int i) const 
{
    return _item[i];
}

This pattern works for both atomic types such as float,int, etc.., as well as more complex struct and class types.

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1  
There's nothing "atomic" about float or int. –  Puppy Nov 27 '11 at 2:03
    
"atomic types" Do you mean fundamental types? non-aggregate types? –  curiousguy Nov 27 '11 at 5:22

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