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I've done the breadth-first search in a normal way. now I'm trying to do it in a multithreaded way. i have one queue which is shared between the threads. i use synchronize(LockObject) when i remove a node from the queue ( FIFI queue ) so what I'm trying to do is that. when i thread finds a solution all the other threads will stop immediately.

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Sorry, what is the question? How to stop the other threads? – Luis Nov 27 '11 at 1:48
    
So each thread will be going down a different path? Is that what you want? – Hunter McMillen Nov 27 '11 at 1:57
    
Every thread will be taking a node and see if it's the goal node or not beside if not he will add to the same queue 4 child nodes. that was my solution. if there is a better way please feel free to share it. thanks – Kassem Nov 27 '11 at 2:08

I gather from your comment on happymeal's anwer that you are trying to find how to reach a specific amount of money by adding coins of 1c, 5c, 10c and 20c.

Since each coin denomination divides the denomination of the next bigger coin, this can be solved in constant time as follows:

int[] coinCount(int amount) {
    int[] coinValue = {20, 10, 5, 1};
    int[] coinCount = new int[coinValue.length];

    for (int i = 0; i < coinValue.length; i++) {
        coinCount[i] = amount / coinValue[i];
        amount -= coinCount[i] * coinValue[i];
    }
    return coinCount;
}

Take home message: Try to optimize your algorithm before resorting to multithreading, because algorithmic improvements can yield much greater improvements.

share|improve this answer
    
Completely agree that the correct solution is not to go multithread, but to optimize it (I even have it in my note). But this looks more like a textbook exercise than anything else. As a matter of fact, if you go breadth first without optimization you can when you reach 8 coins you have 4^8 (2^16, aprox 32E3) solutions, which at 4 bytes per int is 256KB memory. – Luis Nov 27 '11 at 14:03

Assuming you want to do this iteratively (see note at the bottom why there may be better closed solutions), this is not a great problem for exercising multi threading. The problem is that multithreading is great if you don't depend on previous results, but here you want the minimum amount of coins.

As you point out, a breadth first solution guarantees that once you reach the desired amount, you won't have any further solutions with less coins in a single threaded environment. However, in a multithreaded environment, once you start calculating a solution, you cannot guarantee that it will finish before some other solution. Let's imagine for the value 21: it can be a 20c coin and a 1c or four 5c coins and a 1c; if both are calculating simultaneously, you cannot guarantee that the first (and correct) solution will finish first. In practice, it is unlikely the situation will happen, but when you work with multithreading you want the solution to work in theory, because multithreads always fail in the demonstration, no matter if they should not have failed until the death heat of the universe.

Now you have 2 possible solutions: one is to introduce choke points at the beginning of each level; you don't start that level until the previous level is finished. The other is once you reach a solution continue doing all the calculations with a lower level than the current result (which means you cannot purge the others). Probably with all the synchronization needed you get better performance by going single threaded, but let's go on.

For the first solution, the natural form is to iterate increasing the level. You can use the solution provided by happymeal, with a Semaphore. An alternative is to use the new classes provided by java.

CoinSet getCoinSet(int desiredAmount) throws InterruptedException {
  // Use whatever number of threads you prefer or another member of Executors.
  final ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10); 
  ResultContainer container = new ResultContainer();
  container.getNext().add(new Producer(desiredAmount, new CoinSet(), container));
  while (container.getResult() == null) {
    executor.invokeAll(container.setNext(new Vector<Producer>()));
  }
  return container.getResult();
} 

public class Producer implements Callable<CoinSet> {
  private final int desiredAmount;
  private final CoinSet data;
  private final ResultContainer container;

  public Producer(int desiredAmount, CoinSet data, ResultContainer container) {
    this.desiredAmount = desiredAmount;
    this.data = data;
    this.container = container;
  }

  public CoinSet call() {
    if (data.getSum() == desiredAmount) {
      container.setResult(data);
      return data;
    } else {
      Collection<CoinSet> nextSets = data.addCoins();
      for (CoinSet nextSet : nextSets) {
        container.getNext().add(new Producer(desiredAmount, nextSet, container));
      }
      return null;
    }
  }
}

// Probably it is better to split this class, but you then need to pass too many parameters
// The only really needed part is to create a wrapper around getNext, since invokeAll is
// undefined if you modify the list of tasks.
public class ResultContainer {
  // I use Vector because it is synchronized.

  private Vector<Producer> next = new Vector<Producer>();
  private CoinSet result = null;

  // Note I return the existing value.
  public Vector<Producer> setNext(Vector<Producer> newValue) {
    Vector<Producer> current = next;
    next = newValue;
    return current;
  }

  public Vector<Producer> getNext() {
    return next;
  }

  public synchronized void setResult(CoinSet newValue) {
    result = newValue;
  }

  public synchronized CoinSet getResult() {
   return result;
  }
}

This still has the problem that existing tasks are executed; however, it is simple to fix that; pass the thread executor into each Producer (or the container). Then, when you find a result, call executor.shutdownNow. The threads that are executing won't be interrupted, but the operation in each thread is trivial so it will finish fast; the runnables that have not started won't start.

The second option means you have to let all the current tasks finish, unless you keep track of how many tasks you have run at each level. You no longer need to keep track of the levels, though, and you don't need the while cycle. Instead, you just call

executor.submit(new Producer(new CoinSet(), desiredAmount, container)).get();

And then, the call method is pretty similar (assume you have executor in the Producer):

public CoinSet call() {
  if (container.getResult() != null && data.getCount() < container.getResult().getCount()) {
    if (data.getSum() == desiredAmount)) {
      container.setResult(data);
      return data;
    } else {
      Collection<CoinSet> nextSets = data.addCoins();
      for (CoinSet nextSet : nextSets) {
        executor.submit(new Producer(desiredAmount, nextSet, container));
      }
      return null;
    }
  }
}

and you also have to modify container.setResult, since you cannot depend that between the if and setting the value it has not been set by some other threads (threads are really annoying, aren't they?)

public synchronized void setResult(CoinSet newValue) {
  if (newValue.getCount() < result.getCount()) {
    result = newValue;
  }
}

In all previous answers, CoinSet.getSum() returns the sum of the coins in the set, CoinSet.getCount() returns the number of coins, and CoinSet.addCoins() returns a Collection of CoinSet in which each element is the current CoinSet plus one coin of each possible different value

Note: For the problem of the coins with the values 1, 5, 10 and 20, the simplest solution is take the amount and divide it by the largest coin. Then take the modulus of that and use the next largest value and so on. That is the minimum amount of coins you are going to need. This rule applies (AFAICT) when the following property if true: if for all consecutive pairs of coin values (i.e. in this case, 1-5, 5-10, 10-20) you can reach any int multiple of the lower element in the pair with with a smaller number of coins using the larger element and whatever coins are necessary. You only need to prove it to the min common multiple of both elements in the pair (after that it repeats itself)

share|improve this answer
    
Excuse me, what in the question had to do with coins? – Avi Nov 27 '11 at 13:34
    
@Avi: check the comments to happymeal's answer. – meriton Nov 27 '11 at 13:43

i assume you are traversing a tree for your BFS.

create a thread pool. for each unexplored children in the node, retrieve a thread from the thread pool (perhaps using a Semaphore). mark the child node as 'explored' and explore the node's children in a BFS manner. when you have found a solution or done exploring all the nodes, release the semaphore.

^ i've never done this before so i might have missed out something.

share|improve this answer
    
actually i'm buildding the tree and checking at the same time. – Kassem Nov 27 '11 at 4:04
    
actually i'm building the tree as i go, i'm trying to solve the coins problem which is finding the best combination of a given amount of money. best combination means less coins but more value. – Kassem Nov 27 '11 at 4:12
    
the way i did it: starting with a root node in the queue i take this node and expand it ( expand means adding 4 children to it, each child is representing a coin type; for example; 1 cent,5cents 10cents,20 cents) after that i take the first node in the queue and check if it's total value is what i'm looking for ( say 21 cents) if not then i will add 4 children to this node and add it to the queue ( by adding children to the node i mean i create object of type coin -which i created- and inside that object is a variable of type coin also which represents the parent coin). – Kassem Nov 27 '11 at 4:15
1  
Note that if for some reason there are 2 solutions with the correct amount but different coin count and both start executing (because the first one didn't finish before the second one), there is no guarantee that you will get the shorter one unless you manage it separately. See my full answer below. – Luis Nov 27 '11 at 12:01
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've successfully implemented it. what i did is that i toke all the nodes in the first level, let's say 4 nodes. then i had 2 threads. each one takes 2 nodes and generate their children. whenever a bode finds a solution he has to report the level that he found the solution in and limit the searching level so other threads don;t exceed the level. only the reporting method should be synchronized.

i did the code for the coins change problem: this is my code for others to use - not perfect but does the job :) -

Main Class (CoinsProblemBFS.java)

package coinsproblembfs;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Queue;
import java.util.Scanner;

/**
 *
 * @author Kassem M. Bagher
 */
public class CoinsProblemBFS
{

    private static List<Item> MoneyList = new ArrayList<Item>();
    private static Queue<Item> q = new LinkedList<Item>();
    private static LinkedList<Item> tmpQ;
    public static Object lockLevelLimitation = new Object();
    public static int searchLevelLimit = 1000;
    public static Item lastFoundNode = null;
    private static int numberOfThreads = 2;

    private static void InitializeQueu(Item Root)
    {
        for (int x = 0; x < MoneyList.size(); x++)
        {
            Item t = new Item();
            t.value = MoneyList.get(x).value;
            t.Totalvalue = MoneyList.get(x).Totalvalue;
            t.Title = MoneyList.get(x).Title;
            t.parent = Root;
            t.level = 1;
            q.add(t);
        }
    }

    private static int[] calculateQueueLimit(int numberOfItems, int numberOfThreads)
    {
        int total = 0;
        int[] queueLimit = new int[numberOfThreads];

        for (int x = 0; x < numberOfItems; x++)
        {
            if (total < numberOfItems)
            {
                queueLimit[x % numberOfThreads] += 1;
                total++;
            }
            else
            {
                break;
            }
        }
        return queueLimit;
    }

    private static void initializeMoneyList(int numberOfItems, Item Root)
    {
        for (int x = 0; x < numberOfItems; x++)
        {
            Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
            Item t = new Item();
            System.out.print("Enter the Title and Value for item " + (x + 1) + ": ");
            String tmp = input.nextLine();
            t.Title = tmp.split(" ")[0];
            t.value = Double.parseDouble(tmp.split(" ")[1]);
            t.Totalvalue = t.value;
            t.parent = Root;
            MoneyList.add(t);
        }
    }

    private static void printPath(Item item)
    {
        System.out.println("\nSolution Found in Thread:" + item.winnerThreadName + "\nExecution Time: " + item.searchTime + " ms, " + (item.searchTime / 1000) + " s");
        while (item != null)
        {
            for (Item listItem : MoneyList)
            {
                if (listItem.Title.equals(item.Title))
                {
                    listItem.counter++;
                }
            }
            item = item.parent;
        }
        for (Item listItem : MoneyList)
        {
            System.out.println(listItem.Title + " x " + listItem.counter);
        }

    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException
    {
        Item Root = new Item();
        Root.Title = "Root Node";
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.print("Number of Items: ");
        int numberOfItems = input.nextInt();
        input.nextLine();

        initializeMoneyList(numberOfItems, Root);


        System.out.print("Enter the Amount of Money: ");
        double searchValue = input.nextDouble();
        int searchLimit = (int) Math.ceil((searchValue / MoneyList.get(MoneyList.size() - 1).value));
        System.out.print("Number of Threads (Muste be less than the number of items): ");
        numberOfThreads = input.nextInt();

        if (numberOfThreads > numberOfItems)
        {
            System.exit(1);
        }

        InitializeQueu(Root);

        int[] queueLimit = calculateQueueLimit(numberOfItems, numberOfThreads);
        List<Thread> threadList = new ArrayList<Thread>();

        for (int x = 0; x < numberOfThreads; x++)
        {
            tmpQ = new LinkedList<Item>();
            for (int y = 0; y < queueLimit[x]; y++)
            {
                tmpQ.add(q.remove());
            }
            BFS tmpThreadObject = new BFS(MoneyList, searchValue, tmpQ);
            Thread t = new Thread(tmpThreadObject);
            t.setName((x + 1) + "");
            threadList.add(t);
        }

        for (Thread t : threadList)
        {
            t.start();
        }

        boolean finish = false;

        while (!finish)
        {
            Thread.sleep(250);
            for (Thread t : threadList)
            {
                if (t.isAlive())
                {
                    finish = false;
                    break;
                }
                else
                {
                    finish = true;
                }
            }
        }
        printPath(lastFoundNode);

    }
}

Item Class (Item.java)

package coinsproblembfs;

/**
 *
 * @author Kassem
 */
public class Item
{
    String Title = "";
    double value = 0;
    int level = 0;
    double Totalvalue = 0;
    int counter = 0;
    Item parent = null;
    long searchTime = 0;
    String winnerThreadName="";
}

Threads Class (BFS.java)

package coinsproblembfs;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;

/**
 *
 * @author Kassem M. Bagher
 */
public class BFS implements Runnable
{

    private LinkedList<Item> q;
    private List<Item> MoneyList;
    private double searchValue = 0;
    private long start = 0, end = 0;

    public BFS(List<Item> monyList, double searchValue, LinkedList<Item> queue)
    {
        q = new LinkedList<Item>();
        MoneyList = new ArrayList<Item>();
        this.searchValue = searchValue;
        for (int x = 0; x < queue.size(); x++)
        {
            q.addLast(queue.get(x));
        }
        for (int x = 0; x < monyList.size(); x++)
        {
            MoneyList.add(monyList.get(x));
        }
    }

    private synchronized void printPath(Item item)
    {

        while (item != null)
        {
            for (Item listItem : MoneyList)
            {
                if (listItem.Title.equals(item.Title))
                {
                    listItem.counter++;
                }
            }
            item = item.parent;
        }
        for (Item listItem : MoneyList)
        {
            System.out.println(listItem.Title + " x " + listItem.counter);
        }
    }

    private void addChildren(Item node, LinkedList<Item> q, boolean initialized)
    {
        for (int x = 0; x < MoneyList.size(); x++)
        {
            Item t = new Item();
            t.value = MoneyList.get(x).value;
            if (initialized)
            {
                t.Totalvalue = 0;
                t.level = 0;
            }
            else
            {
                t.parent = node;
                t.Totalvalue = MoneyList.get(x).Totalvalue;
                if (t.parent == null)
                {
                    t.level = 0;
                }
                else
                {
                    t.level = t.parent.level + 1;
                }
            }
            t.Title = MoneyList.get(x).Title;
            q.addLast(t);
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        try
        {
            while (!q.isEmpty())
            {
                Item node = null;
                node = (Item) q.removeFirst();
                node.Totalvalue = node.value + node.parent.Totalvalue;
                if (node.level < CoinsProblemBFS.searchLevelLimit)
                {
                    if (node.Totalvalue == searchValue)
                    {
                        synchronized (CoinsProblemBFS.lockLevelLimitation)
                        {
                            CoinsProblemBFS.searchLevelLimit = node.level;
                            CoinsProblemBFS.lastFoundNode = node;
                            end = System.currentTimeMillis();
                            CoinsProblemBFS.lastFoundNode.searchTime = (end - start);
                            CoinsProblemBFS.lastFoundNode.winnerThreadName=Thread.currentThread().getName();
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        if (node.level + 1 < CoinsProblemBFS.searchLevelLimit)
                        {
                            addChildren(node, q, false);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        } catch (Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Sample Input:

Number of Items: 4
Enter the Title and Value for item 1: one 1
Enter the Title and Value for item 2: five 5
Enter the Title and Value for item 3: ten 10
Enter the Title and Value for item 4: twenty 20
Enter the Amount of Money: 150
Number of Threads (Muste be less than the number of items): 2
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