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I don't know how to trim text honestly.

What I have so far:

wget --output-document=- http://www.geupdate.com 2>/dev/null \
| grep last \

Outputs:

<li><b><img src='http://www.geupdate.com/img/arrow-tail.png' align='left'>Time since last update</b>: <br />0 day, 19 hours, 23 min, 36 sec</li><li><b><img src='http://www.geupdate.com/img/ledlightblue.png' align='left'>An Update to occur within:</b> (<a href='http://www.geupdate.com/update-prediction/'><font size='-2'>?</font></a>) <br />0 day, 21 hours, 56 min, 30 sec</li>               </ul>

What I actually want to trim out of this is:

0 day, 19 hours, 23 min, 36 sec

If anyone can tell me how write something or write it if it's that simple, that would be nice!

When I run this:

wget --output-document=- http://www.geupdate.com 2>/dev/null \
| grep last \
| grep -o '[[:digit:]]* day.* sec'

I get this:

0 day, 19 hours, 43 min, 16 sec</li><li><b><img src='http://www.geupdate.com/img/ledlightblue.png' align='left'>An Update to occur within:</b> (<a href='http://www.geupdate.com/update-prediction/'><font size='-2'>?</font></a>) <br />0 day, 21 hours, 36 min, 50 sec
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
wget --output-document=- http://www.geupdate.com 2>/dev/null \
| grep last \
| grep -o '[[:digit:]]* days*, [[:digit:]]* hours*, [[:digit:]]* min, [[:digit:]]* sec' \
| head -1
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How would I cut off everything after the "sec" then? –  Aaron Nov 27 '11 at 2:13
1  
@Aaron: That does cut off everything after the sec. The -o flag to grep tells it to produce only the substring that matches the pattern, rather than pulling the entire line containing it. ("O" for "only". Though the mnemonic explains only half of its behavior: echo 1234 | grep -o '[1234]' will print each of 1, 2, 3, and 4 on separate lines, which IMHO isn't obvious from the name "only".) –  ruakh Nov 27 '11 at 2:17
    
Okay thank you let me try running this again :3 –  Aaron Nov 27 '11 at 2:22
1  
@Aaron: Oops, sorry, I didn't notice that there were two separate instances of the "# day, # hours, # min, # sec" formula. I've modified my answer to give a stricter match that will catch only one instance at a time, and added a | head -1 to suppress all but the first instance. –  ruakh Nov 27 '11 at 2:31
1  
Re: how to know this stuff: I don't know. I've slowly come across these utilities over time. I don't know of a good resource that walks you through all the useful ones. I suppose en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Unix_utilities is a good start. Re: to catch the nth instance: instead of | head -1, you can do (for example) | head -5 | tail -1 to get the fifth instance. head -5 outputs the first five lines of its input, and tail -1 outputs the last line of its input, so head -5 | tail -1 outputs the fifth line of its input. –  ruakh Nov 27 '11 at 2:37

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