Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following test

def test_employees_not_arround_for_more_than_3_rounds(self):
    self.game_object.generate_workers()

    people_in_list_turn_1 = self.game_object.employees[:]
    self.game_object.next_turn()
    self.game_object.generate_workers()
    self.game_object.next_turn()
    self.game_object.generate_workers()
    self.game_object.next_turn()

    for employee in people_in_list_turn_1:
        self.assertFalse(employee in self.game_object.employees)

Basically, it generates a random number of workers and adds this to my game_object.employees list. When I call the game_object.next_turn function, every employee has a turns_unemployed variable that holds the number of turns they have been unemployed, once this reaches 3, the worker will be removed from the game_object.employees list altogether.

Here follows the implementation code from game_object.py:

def generate_workers(self):
    workersToAdd = range(random.randrange(1,8))
    for i in workersToAdd:
        self.__employees.append(Employee())

def next_turn(self):
    self.__current_turn += 1
    self.__call_employees_turn_function()
    self.__remove_workers_unemployed_for_3_rounds()

def __call_employees_turn_function(self):
    for employee in self.employees:
        employee.turn()

def __remove_workers_unemployed_for_3_rounds(self):
    for employee in self.employees:
        if employee.turns_unemployed >= 3:
            self.employees.remove(employee)

I already have a test that checks that the turns_unemployed variable is actually increased by one when employee.turn() is called, so I know that works...

The thing that really bugs me here is that my test only works 50% of the time i run it, and I can’t figure out why... Anyone see anything that can cause any discrepancies?

Btw, running Python 3.2.2

share|improve this question
    
Spelling: arround -> around –  Chris Morgan Nov 27 '11 at 4:01
2  
From a code clarity perspective, I would recommend that you inline __call_employees_turn_function and __remove_workers_unemployed_for_3_rounds into next_turn. They're both very short. Just put in a descriptive comment like # remove workers unemployed for 3 rounds. –  Chris Morgan Nov 27 '11 at 4:04
1  
Also, __remove_workers_unemployed_for_3_rounds is very specific. What if you change the rules later so that unemployed workers stay round for four rounds? I think it better to use a less specific (and shorter) name in such cases if you are going to have it as a separate method. Perhaps something like remove_long_term_unemployed. Or perhaps even purge_tramps. –  Chris Morgan Nov 27 '11 at 4:07
    
@Chris Moran: When you said "From a code clarity perspective, I would recommend that you inline" was that a typo? The code is clearer when it has an extra clearly-named function. Did you mean faster? –  Danny Milosavljevic Jul 23 '12 at 10:30
1  
@RobinHeggelundHansen: as I said, "if you feel particularly in need of comments." I would consider what's happening to be quite obvious and so would probably not put comments in there. –  Chris Morgan Jul 25 '12 at 8:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are removing items from a list while iterating over it in __remove_workers_unemployed_for_3_rounds, so the loop skips items you would want it to remove. You need to iterate over a copy of the list.

def __remove_workers_unemployed_for_3_rounds(self):
    for employee in self.employees[:]:
        if employee.turns_unemployed >= 3:
            self.employees.remove(employee)

Example:

You generate 2 new employees on each turn. On the 4th turn, you have 2 employees to remove (the two first in the list). You begin iterating and remove the first one. The list has only five items now, but iterating goes on and looks at the second item. The problem is that the second item is not the second employee anymore, but the third. The second employee will remain in the list and your test will fail. Your test only works if only one employee is generated on the first turn.

share|improve this answer

Hugo is probably right about what's causing your problem; you can't remove items from a list while you're iterating over it. Here's another possible problem though, when you create employees, you put them in a list called __employees, i.e.

def generate_workers(self):
    workersToAdd = range(random.randrange(1,8))
    for i in workersToAdd:
        self.__employees.append(Employee())

but when you iterate over them later, you're using a list called employees, i.e.

def __call_employees_turn_function(self):
    for employee in self.employees:
        employee.turn()

def __remove_workers_unemployed_for_3_rounds(self):
    for employee in self.employees:
        if employee.turns_unemployed >= 3:
            self.employees.remove(employee)

But I don't know if this is related to your problem because I can't see the rest of your code - I'm not even sure if these are in the same class or not. You should probably post the smallest complete piece of code you can get which has the problem -- that way people can actually run your code and reproduce the issue for themselves.

share|improve this answer
    
Upvoted you for the tip on posting enough code that other people cun run it for themselves. To explain away your confusion though: employees is a property which has a getter that returns __employees. I'm glad you pointed this out though, as using employees instead of __employees is a consistancy error in my code, thanks! :D –  Robin Heggelund Hansen Nov 27 '11 at 4:49
    
Got it, thanks for the clarification! –  Philip Uren Nov 27 '11 at 4:57

Don't modify containers that you're iterating over.

Keeping a copy to iterate over is an ugly hack, too, and it may trip you up later in cases where you have to be really precise about object identity vs object equality. It's also just plain messy.

There is a much simpler way: take the functional programming approach. Create a new container using the rule "everything from the original container that doesn't meet the condition for being removed", and then start using that instead of the original container.

def __remove_workers_unemployed_for_3_rounds(self):
    self.employees = filter(lambda e: e.turns_unemployed < 3, self.employees)
    # Or with a list comprehension:
    # self.employees = [e for e in self.employees if e.turns_unemployed < 3]
    # if you find that more readable.
share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand why this is in any way a better solution? Basically you are just taking the extra step of creating a pre-filtered list of objects to be deleted from. Don't understand your argument about object identity vs equality either, as in both cases you'll be iterating over references to the same objects... Not trying to sound/be rude, just wanting to understand why this is better? –  Robin Heggelund Hansen Nov 27 '11 at 12:15
1  
I'm not "creating a pre-filtered list of objects to be deleted from"; the filtering removes the undesired objects. In a single expression, you get the result you're after, and then you can start using it by just assigning it back to the attribute. There is no "extra step". The code you see is the entire process. Simple is better than complex. I was handwaving with the rest, and actually I don't see now where it would cause a problem, but it's still ugly to iterate over a copy of the references. –  Karl Knechtel Nov 27 '11 at 12:50
    
I like this -- avoids the original problem and achieves the desired operation with one line of code. +1 –  Philip Uren Nov 27 '11 at 13:22
    
Ahh, when you say it like that ;) Sadly, I can't accept both answers, but I gave you an upvote both for the original answer and your more explaining comment. :) –  Robin Heggelund Hansen Nov 27 '11 at 13:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.