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Below are two ways of reading in the commandline parameters. The first is the way that I'm accustom to seeing using the parameter in the main. The second I stumbled on when reviewing code. I noticed that the second assigns the first item in the array to the path and application but the first skips this.

Is it just preference or is the second way the better way now?

Sub Main(ByVal args() As String)
    For i As Integer = 0 To args.Length - 1
        Console.WriteLine("Arg: " & i & " is " & args(i))
    Next

    Console.ReadKey()
End Sub



Sub Main()
    Dim args() As String = System.Environment.GetCommandLineArgs()

    For i As Integer = 0 To args.Length - 1
        Console.WriteLine("Arg: " & i & " is " & args(i))
    Next

    Console.ReadKey()
End Sub

I think the same can be done in C#, so it's not necessarily a vb.net question.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Second way is better because it can be used outside the main(), so when you refactor it's one less thing to think about.

Also I don't like the "magic" that puts the args in the method parameter for the first way.

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1  
+ 1 for Single Responsibility Principle –  Randy Eppinger Apr 28 '10 at 19:58
    
It can be used outside the main() method, yes. But what happens when you want to instantiate the class and call it? You have to invoke it via the command line, or it ignores your parameters, right? wouldn't it be better to have multiple signatures, one with passed-in args, and one without; where the one without will extract them from the System.CommandLine and pass to the other? –  Michael Paulukonis May 9 '11 at 16:10
    
@michael, of course, I wouldn't place a call to that method in a "Core" assembly, only in the console project. I was more thinking along the lines of having something like a Settings class or equivalent, that would take care of parsing the arguments in a way that it's usable for the rest of the app. –  David Thibault May 10 '11 at 19:27

Do you know getopt? There is a port for C# on codeplex: http://www.codeplex.com/getopt

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The first way is better because it's simpler.

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To me the first way seems more intuitive because that is how I have been doing it since my C/C++ days.

If your commandline has one too many switches please do take a look at getopt that Thomas recommends. It's quite useful. I haven't had a look at C# port of the same though.

Regards,

kgr

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