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I've got a helper class that scans my entire project directory and collects a list of source files and the corresponding (target) object files. The dependencies on the compile task is defined after scanning the source directory as shown below.

CLEAN.include(FileList[obj_dir + '**/*.o'])
CLOBBER.include(FileList[exe_dir + '**/*.exe'])

$proj = DirectoryParser.new(src_dir)

$proj.source_files.each do |source_file|
  file source_file.obj_file do
    sh "gcc -c ..."
  end
end

$proj.obj_files.each do |obj_file|
  task :compile => obj_file
end

task :compile do
end

Since $proj is global, the DirectoryParser.new() is invoked when any of the tasks are called including clean and clobber. This makes the clean and clobber tasks slow and that is not desirable.

To get around the problem I moved all the generation of File dependencies into the default task. This makes my clean and clobber tasks fast, however, I can't call my compile or link tasks independently now.

CLEAN.include(FileList[obj_dir + '**/*.o'])
CLOBBER.include(FileList[exe_dir + '**/*.exe'])

task :compile => $proj.source_files do   # Throws error!
end

task :default => do
  $proj = DirectoryParser.new(src_dir)

  $proj.source_files.each do |source_file|
    file source_file.obj_file do
      sh "gcc -c ..."
    end
  end

  $proj.obj_files.each do |obj_file|
    task :compile => obj_file
  end

  ... compile
  ... link
  ... execute
end

How do I get around this problem? I am sure someone has previously encountered a similar problem. I'd appreciate any help.

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I've decided to keep the same solution above at the cost of the clean and clobber tasks taking a bit longer than I'd like. Unless someone comes up with a better solution? –  thegreendroid Dec 3 '11 at 4:33

2 Answers 2

You could try a two step approach.

Create a new task generate_dependecies. This task builds a (static) rake file with your dependecies and actions.

This generated rakefile can be loaded in your rake file.

Some sample code (untested):

GENERATED = 'generated_dependecies.rb'
´
task :generate_dependecies => do
  $proj = DirectoryParser.new(src_dir)

  File.open('GENERATED', 'w'){|f|
  $proj.source_files.each do |source_file|
    f << <<code
    file #{source_file.obj_file} do
      sh "gcc -c ..."
    end
code
  end

  $proj.obj_files.each do |obj_file|
    f << "task :compile => #{obj_file}"
  end

  #~ ... compile
  #~ ... link
  #~ ... execute
end

require GENERATED

Now you have two steps:

  1. create an empty 'generated_dependecies.rb' (so you get no error, when you call the script the first time.
  2. call rake generate_dependecies
  3. Check the generated file - if not ok, change the generator ;)
  4. call rake compile or rake link (or rake if you want to use the default task) ... - the dependecies are defined in the generated file.

    • When something change (new source code...), continue with steps 2+4.
    • If the structure keeps the same (no new files, only code changes) you need only step 4.
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Thanks for the answer. Does that mean 'rake generate_dependencies' and 'rake install' has to be called manually by the user? That places an unnecessary burden on the user and I don't really want that. I want that to happen transparently as far as the user is concerned. –  thegreendroid Nov 27 '11 at 20:07
    
I think not. I changed my answer a bit. You may define the default as you want (e.g. the sequence compile, link and execute). Before you run the default, you must run once rake generate_dependencies. The only problem you have: If the structure changes (new source codes...) anyone must call rake generate_dependencies to update the dependecies. I tried to get a 'real' solution, but I ran into problems - in the same time I had the idea with this two step solution. Not really a full solution, but sometimes it better to have a half solution then no solution. –  knut Nov 27 '11 at 23:17
    
Thanks for the response again. Running generate_dependencies manually is not what I am after, as it will place a burden on the user to remember things and from experience that can be very error-prone. The work-around I've used works, but the only drawback is that you can't call compile/link tasks independently (you have to call rake which invokes the default task). –  thegreendroid Nov 28 '11 at 5:41
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I managed to get around this problem elegantly by using the Singleton design pattern and moving away from using Rake file/task dependencies completely. DirectoryParser is now a singleton class (by mixing in Ruby's built-in 'singleton' library)

CLEAN.include(FileList[obj_dir + '**/*.o'])
CLOBBER.include(FileList[exe_dir + '**/*.exe'])

task :compile do
  $proj = DirectoryParser.instance
  $proj.source_files.each do |source_file|
      sh "gcc -c ..." unless uptodate?(obj_file, source_file)
  end
end

task :link do
  $proj = DirectoryParser.instance
  ...
end

Now my clean/clobber tasks are fast and I can still call compile/link tasks independently.

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