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I have a list of tuples like the following that I'm getting back from Solr:

 [('Second Circuit', 34), ('Ninth Circuit', 24), ('Third Circuit', 4), ('Eleventh Circuit', 2)]

Note that not only the second, third, ninth and eleventh circuits were returned.

I need to order this according to an ordering tuple I have that looks like this:

COURT_ORDER = (
    'Supreme Court',
    'First Circuit',
    'Second Circuit',
    'Third Circuit',
    'Fourth Circuit',
    ...and so on...,
)

The desired output, after sorting would be:

 [('Second Circuit', 34), ('Third Circuit', 4), ('Ninth Circuit', 24), ('Eleventh Circuit', 2)]

Is there a clever way of doing this?

(This needs to get tagged with the Sunburnt tag, if possible, but I can't create it, for lack of points.)

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re the tagging: I hardly see how the source of your data is relevant to the problem of sorting it. –  Karl Knechtel Nov 27 '11 at 10:21
    
Sorting facets is something that others that use the Sunburnt library will probably want to do, so it should be tagged appropriately, though I understand that this is primarily a Python question. –  mlissner Nov 28 '11 at 2:41

2 Answers 2

Build a dictionary that maps the court name to the desired ranking. Then sort with a key function that looks up the court name to find the ranking:

>>> COURT_ORDER = (
    'Supreme Court',
    'First Circuit',
    'Second Circuit',
    'Third Circuit',
    'Fourth Circuit',
    'Ninth Circuit',
    'Eleventh Circuit',
)
>>> court_seq = dict(zip(COURT_ORDER, range(len(COURT_ORDER))))
>>> lot = [('Second Circuit', 34), ('Ninth Circuit', 24), ('Third Circuit', 4), ('Eleventh Circuit', 2)]
>>> sorted(lot, key=lambda t: court_seq[t[0]])
[('Second Circuit', 34), ('Third Circuit', 4), ('Ninth Circuit', 24), ('Eleventh Circuit', 2)]

For more insights on how to sort, see the Sorting HOWTO.

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Karl Mnechtels example using an index into the ordered list means that the dictionary is no longer needed. –  Paddy3118 Nov 27 '11 at 14:05
    
@Paddy3118 A dictionary is preferred for its O(1) lookup time. Indexing a list is slow and is rarely TheRightWayToDoIt(tm). –  Raymond Hettinger Nov 27 '11 at 17:25

key the items according to the index of the first appearance of their [0] item in the COURT_ORDER:

data = [('Second Circuit', 34), ('Ninth Circuit', 24), ('Third Circuit', 4), ('Eleventh Circuit', 2)]
sorted(data, key = lambda x: COURT_ORDER.index(x[0]))
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