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I am creating a ToggleSwitchItem user control, which contains a ToggleSwitch and a TextBlock. I have defined a dependency property called IsChecked which I just want to use to expose the IsChecked property of the private ToggleSwitch child.

But the data binding doesn't work... It just stays at the default value when loaded.

What am I missing?

Code:

public static readonly DependencyProperty IsCheckedProperty =
    DependencyProperty.Register(
        "IsChecked",
        typeof(bool),
        typeof(ToggleSwitchItem),
        new PropertyMetadata(new PropertyChangedCallback
          (OnIsCheckedChanged)));

public bool IsChecked
{
  get
  {
    return (bool)GetValue(IsCheckedProperty);
  }
  set
  {
    SetValue(IsCheckedProperty, value);
  }
}

private static void OnIsCheckedChanged(DependencyObject d,
  DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
  ToggleSwitchItem item = (ToggleSwitchItem)d;
  bool newValue = (bool)e.NewValue;
  item.m_switch.IsChecked = newValue;
}

for the data binding, I'm using to following:

<phone:PhoneApplicationPage.Resources>
    <myApp:SharedPreferences x:Key="appSettings"/>
</phone:PhoneApplicationPage.Resources>

IsChecked="{Binding Source={StaticResource appSettings}, 
    Path=SomeProperty, Mode=TwoWay}" 

The SharedPreferences class is working fine, as it works without issue when bound to a plain vanilla ToggleSwitch's IsChecked property exactly as per above.

Thanks!


SOLUTION (with help from Anthony):

I bind my child toggle switch to my user control in the user control's constructor like so:

Binding binding = new Binding();
binding.Source = this;
binding.Path = new PropertyPath("IsChecked");
binding.Mode = BindingMode.TwoWay;
m_switch.SetBinding(ToggleSwitch.IsCheckedProperty, binding);

And I remove the callback as I no longer need it:

public static readonly DependencyProperty IsCheckedProperty =
    DependencyProperty.Register(
        "IsChecked",
        typeof(bool),
        typeof(ToggleSwitchItem),
        null);

public bool IsChecked
{
  get
  {
    return (bool)GetValue(IsCheckedProperty);
  }
  set
  {
    SetValue(IsCheckedProperty, value);
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Thanks for this. I had problems getting the binding to work as well when done in pure XAML. Only when setting up the binding in code behind did things work. –  t9mike Jan 28 '13 at 22:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I can't quite see what is actually wrong with the code you've show so far, except that you haven't show how the user toggling the switch would actually cause the IsChecked property to change.

Have you try using binding inside the UserControl:

<ToggleButton IsChecked="{Binding Parent.IsChecked, ElementName=LayoutRoot, Mode=TwoWay}" />

You do not need the OnPropertyChanged callback with this approach.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! This works! Thanks. Except I needed to do it in codebehind. Updated my question above with the codebehind code. –  swinefeaster Nov 27 '11 at 19:52
    
You can also set the DataContext of LayoutRoot to the user control's constructor: LayoutRoot.DataContext = this; In the xaml you can omit the Parent and LayoutRoot declaration: `<ToggleButton IsChecked="{Binding IsChecked}" /> –  saxos Oct 26 '12 at 11:54

Check the DataContext of your control.Which means 2 things : All instances of your control must have right DataContext to work -ok-, and also you should not 'break' this DataContext when you define the control (at the Class level). If, when you define your control, you set the DataContext to 'this' / Me in code or to 'Self' in xaml, it nows refer only to itself and forget about the DataContext in which it is when you instanciate it in your application -- Binding fails.

If you have to refer to your control's properties within your control Xaml, use a binding with findAncestor / AncestorType = ToggleSwitchItem Or name your control in Xaml and bind with its ElementName.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if I follow you. I added to the binding xaml and more info in the question above, hope this clarifies? –  swinefeaster Nov 27 '11 at 8:46
    
i tried to clarify. –  GameAlchemist Nov 27 '11 at 9:20
    
Is it clear now ? I wonder wether the Xaml you put is in your control?? Or in an instance of it ?? because if it is the control's Xaml, you are binding to an instance of your AppSettings which will not do anything to the instance you are using in your Application. –  GameAlchemist Nov 27 '11 at 9:57
    
And ToggleSwitch + TextBox = CheckBox, so much simpler redefining the 'Content' of your checkBox if, for instance, you want your text to wrap. ( < CheckBox IsChecked="..." > < TextBlock ... > < / CheckBox > –  GameAlchemist Nov 27 '11 at 10:03
    
Thanks Vincent. I use xaml only for instantiating my custom control on my page; I create the toggle switch in codebehind inside my custom control. The AppSettings is class that reads from a central isolated store, so the instancing cannot be the problem. A toggle switch is different from a checkbox --- a checkbox has a box with a checkmark, while a toggle switch has a thingy that is moved left and right. –  swinefeaster Nov 27 '11 at 19:38

Maybe this could help

public bool IsChecked
    {
        get { return GetValue(IsCheckedProperty) is bool ? (bool) GetValue(IsCheckedProperty) : false; }
        set
        {
            SetValue(IsCheckedProperty, value);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

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